Slideshows

Content posted in October 2016
5 Signs Your Smartphone Has Been Hacked
Slideshows  |  10/28/2016  | 
Mobile devices are increasingly popular vectors for cybercriminals targeting the enterprise. How to tell when a smartphone may be under attack.
7 Scary Ransomware Families
Slideshows  |  10/25/2016  | 
Here are seven ransomware variants that can creep up on you.
7 Imminent IoT Threats
Slideshows  |  10/21/2016  | 
Attacks against smart home products, medical devices, SCADA systems, and other newly network-enabled systems signal the beginning of a new wave of attacks against the IoT.
9 Sources For Tracking New Vulnerabilities
Slideshows  |  10/20/2016  | 
Keeping up with the latest vulnerabilities -- especially in the context of the latest threats -- can be a real challenge.
7 Regional Hotbeds For Cybersecurity Innovation
Slideshows  |  10/18/2016  | 
These regions are driving cybersecurity innovation across the US with an abundance of tech talent, educational institutions, accelerators, incubators, and startup activity.
5 Tips For Keeping Small Businesses Secure
Slideshows  |  10/17/2016  | 
In honor of National Cyber Security Awareness Month, a look at that five-step process developed by the BBB and NCSA.
Happy 30th Birthday CFAA!
Slideshows  |  10/14/2016  | 
Six things we still dont know about the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act after all this time.
7 Ways Electronic Voting Systems Can Be Attacked
Slideshows  |  10/13/2016  | 
Pre-election integrity tests and post-election audits and checks should help spot discrepancies and errors, but risks remain.
Inside A Bug-Hunter's Head: 6 Motivators
Slideshows  |  10/7/2016  | 
Who are bug bounty hunters, and why do they hack? We dig inside the motivators driving today's hackers to seek vulnerabilities.
5 Ways To Lock Down Your Login
Slideshows  |  10/4/2016  | 
New public awareness campaign inspired by the White House calls for users to think more carefully about stronger authentication.
16 Innovative Cybersecurity Technologies Of 2016
Slideshows  |  10/3/2016  | 
This year's SINET 16 Innovators were chosen from 82 applicants representing nine countries.


Four Faces of Fraud: Identity, 'Fake' Identity, Ransomware & Digital
David Shefter, Chief Technology Officer at Ziften Technologies,  6/14/2018
Demystifying Mental Health in the Infosec Community
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  6/14/2018
Email, Social Media Still Security Nightmares
Dark Reading Staff 6/15/2018
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From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2016-10723
PUBLISHED: 2018-06-21
** DISPUTED ** An issue was discovered in the Linux kernel through 4.17.2. Since the page allocator does not yield CPU resources to the owner of the oom_lock mutex, a local unprivileged user can trivially lock up the system forever by wasting CPU resources from the page allocator (e.g., via concurre...
CVE-2017-13072
PUBLISHED: 2018-06-21
Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in App Center in QNAP QTS 4.2.6 build 20171208, QTS 4.3.3 build 20171213, QTS 4.3.4 build 20171223, and their earlier versions could allow remote attackers to inject Javascript code.
CVE-2017-2669
PUBLISHED: 2018-06-21
Dovecot before version 2.2.29 is vulnerable to a denial of service. When 'dict' passdb and userdb were used for user authentication, the username sent by the IMAP/POP3 client was sent through var_expand() to perform %variable expansion. Sending specially crafted %variable fields could result in exce...
CVE-2017-2672
PUBLISHED: 2018-06-21
A flaw was found in foreman before version 1.15 in the logging of adding and registering images. An attacker with access to the foreman log file would be able to view passwords for provisioned systems in the log file, allowing them to access those systems.
CVE-2018-0712
PUBLISHED: 2018-06-21
Command injection vulnerability in LDAP Server in QNAP QTS 4.2.6 build 20171208, QTS 4.3.3 build 20180402, QTS 4.3.4 build 20180413 and their earlier versions could allow remote attackers to run arbitrary commands or install malware on the NAS.