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Commentary

Content posted in August 2008
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What Is Short Stroking And Why Should You Care?
Commentary  |  8/6/2008  | 
As the major storage vendors start rolling out the Solid State Disk solutions, you're going to hear a term that you may not have heard for a while, if ever; short stroking. Short stroking a drive is a method to format a drive so that only the outer sectors of the disk platter are used to store data. This practice is done in I/O-intensive environments to increase performance.
Antivirus Software Heads for the Clouds
Commentary  |  8/6/2008  | 
When you stop and think about it, there's nothing really new about "cloud computing" other than it being a buzzword du jour for high-tech hypemeisters. That's not to say that as a concept, cloud computing -- Internet-based infrastructures that deliver IT services -- isn't useful. It most certainly is, and with any luck at all, new and unique applications for cloud computing will continue to pop up. Like the CloudAV project at the University of Michigan, for instance.
Black Hat 2008, First Day Sessions
Commentary  |  8/5/2008  | 
I've been in Las Vegas for a couple of days now, meeting with some old friends in the information security community, and making a few new ones. This year, the annual Black Hat confab will be serving interesting talks on the security implications of virtualization, social networks, and Web 2.0. Should make a good conference that will highlight some of the big security concerns going forward.
Trio Of New Security Companies Launching This Week
Commentary  |  8/5/2008  | 
Busy week in the security business -- at least three new companies hope it's a busy week. Targeting security software-as-a-service (SaaS), anti-malware needs and cloud security, the companies are launching a variety of ambitious technology strategies.
Enterprise Solid State Disk - Where Are We?
Commentary  |  8/4/2008  | 
It seems like everyone is jumping into SSD (Solid State Disk) today. EMC, Sun, Hitachi, HP, and others have all made announcements about adopting SSD. As I discussed in an earlier entry, the numbers certainly make good conversation pieces, but where are we in terms of ma
Hacking Nukes
Commentary  |  8/4/2008  | 
It's rare that I read something in a press release that I agree with, let alone find frightening, but this release from Lumeta scared the heebe geebees out of me.
FileVault Is Flawed; And Apple's Not Talk'n
Commentary  |  8/1/2008  | 
A security researcher hoping to discuss an undisclosed Apple flaw at next week's annual Black Hat conference in Las Vegas pulls his talk. Then, Apple suddenly jumps ship on a planned security panel to be conducted by its engineers. These incidents expose Apple's being a laggard in its approach to IT security.
Disk-Based Archive - Ready For Prime Time
Commentary  |  8/1/2008  | 
The drumbeat is being heard. A recent survey commissioned by Permabit Technology generated some interesting results. While almost every answer creates interesting blog material, the stats that jumped out at me were that almost 25% of those surveyed are managing more than 100 TB of primary storage and that 43% of those surveyed were paying $25 to $40-plus per gigabyte for that primary storage. These stats make it quite clear -- you can't afford not to archiv
Apple Patch Misses Some DNS Problems
Commentary  |  8/1/2008  | 
Apple's release of a raft of patches included an overdue one for the DNS hole that's gotten so much attention over the past few weeks. Unfortunately the patch leaves some DNS problems still in the hole.
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