Commentary

Content posted in December 2006
Technology Jeopardizes The Secret Ballot
Commentary  |  12/15/2006  | 
Ed Felten at Freedom to Tinker has several brief, but meaty, posts this week on the erosion of a pillar of Western democracy: The secret ballot. The secret ballot offers two forms of protection: Because nobody can look over your shoulder to see how you voted, it's hard to coerce your vote. And, because you can't prove to anybody how you voted, you can't sell your vote. But technology and social trends are making the secret ballot harder to preserv
Outsource Security Carefully, And Carry A Big Audit Plan
Commentary  |  12/15/2006  | 
Are IT managers desperate if they outsource security? That's the provocative question Larry Greenemeier asks in today's issue of InformationWeek. His conclusion? A resolute no. In fact, hiring an independent service provider might just be your best bet for staying safe in the midst of rising threats against malware, hackers, and internal saboteurs.
Seven Steps To Follow When Data Leakage Strikes
Commentary  |  12/14/2006  | 
At a recent summit on "data leakage," which sounds like an unfortunate side effect to a prescription medication, Experian Corp. chief information security officer James Christiansen provided a very useful rundown of what to do before, during, and
Protecting Against Insider Threats
Commentary  |  12/11/2006  | 
When you visualize what a computer criminal looks like, you probably think of a teen-ager living in his mother's basement, or a shady-looking character in a lawless country far away. But if you want to know what the most dangerous computer criminals look like, take a look at the guy sitting in the next cube.

Spam's Making A Comeback And We're All Stuck With It
Commentary  |  12/6/2006  | 
The New York Times reports grim news that anybody watching their e-mail in-boxes already knew: Spam is making a comeback. Worldwide spam volumes doubled since last year, and spam now accounts for more than 90% of e-mail worldwide. And it doesn't look like the problem is going away.



Google Engineering Lead on Lessons Learned From Chrome's HTTPS Push
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  8/8/2018
White Hat to Black Hat: What Motivates the Switch to Cybercrime
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  8/8/2018
PGA of America Struck By Ransomware
Dark Reading Staff 8/9/2018
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CVE-2018-3937
PUBLISHED: 2018-08-14
An exploitable command injection vulnerability exists in the measurementBitrateExec functionality of Sony IPELA E Series Network Camera G5 firmware 1.87.00. A specially crafted GET request can cause arbitrary commands to be executed. An attacker can send an HTTP request to trigger this vulnerability...
CVE-2018-3938
PUBLISHED: 2018-08-14
An exploitable stack-based buffer overflow vulnerability exists in the 802dot1xclientcert.cgi functionality of Sony IPELA E Series Camera G5 firmware 1.87.00. A specially crafted POST can cause a stack-based buffer overflow, resulting in remote code execution. An attacker can send a malicious POST r...
CVE-2018-12537
PUBLISHED: 2018-08-14
In Eclipse Vert.x version 3.0 to 3.5.1, the HttpServer response headers and HttpClient request headers do not filter carriage return and line feed characters from the header value. This allow unfiltered values to inject a new header in the client request or server response.
CVE-2018-12539
PUBLISHED: 2018-08-14
In Eclipse OpenJ9 version 0.8, users other than the process owner may be able to use Java Attach API to connect to an Eclipse OpenJ9 or IBM JVM on the same machine and use Attach API operations, which includes the ability to execute untrusted native code. Attach API is enabled by default on Windows,...
CVE-2018-3615
PUBLISHED: 2018-08-14
Systems with microprocessors utilizing speculative execution and Intel software guard extensions (Intel SGX) may allow unauthorized disclosure of information residing in the L1 data cache from an enclave to an attacker with local user access via a side-channel analysis.