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Application Security

11/10/2014
11:30 AM
Jeff Williams
Jeff Williams
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The Staggering Complexity of Application Security

During the past few decades of high-speed coding we have automated our businesses so fast that we are now incapable of securing what we have built.

Click on this link  for an interactive view of the Word Cloud by David McCandless.
Click on this link for an interactive view of the Word Cloud by David McCandless.

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Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
11/10/2014 | 12:19:33 PM
Devils you know
I know a few people who do a little freelance tech security work and several of them have pointed out major bugs to corporations about their sites or apps and often times, the flaw isn't fixed because it would require such an upheavel. It's worrying and makes you wonder when a big breach occurs, whether the company knew about it and chose to do nothing.

The delemna of course is that those firms will be damned if they interrupt service for a fix, and damned if they get caught out later. It's a difficult situation to be in. 
Stratustician
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Stratustician,
User Rank: Moderator
11/10/2014 | 1:27:02 PM
Re: Devils you know
So true.  For me I find it's usually one of 2 issues that cause these security issues. Often DevOps teams don't have good security input early enough in the design stage, or don't keep up with testing prior to release. The other option is they bring security in way too late and then plug their ears when vulnerabilities in the code are detected by the security team after release, and then it's much harder to pull the app or change it without causing downtime. 

That or overall folks just don't feel that app security is that important to the overall security posture of an organization, which sadly is why we might be in this position in the first place.
Marilyn Cohodas
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50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
11/11/2014 | 9:39:44 AM
Re: Devils you know
@Stratustician It's hard for me to imagine that DevOps can still be so tone deaf when it comes to appsec when vulnerabilities like Heartbleed and POODLE have become so commonplace in security news reports. 
af_bugcrowd
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50%
af_bugcrowd,
User Rank: Author
11/12/2014 | 6:31:52 PM
Re: Devils you know
It's only going to be worse in mobile vulnerabilities once the eyeballs and money on them catches up to usage. There are so many different devices that are going to be unique creases in many of them.  
TerryB
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0%
TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
11/10/2014 | 1:27:34 PM
What can you control?
Great article and insight. But doesn't this only work if EVERYONE in the stack does it? Your testing may show that your product is fine but holes in o/s or browser still expose you. Maybe I'm just naive but were the old mainframes running MVS-370 as vulnerable as Windows/browser you run apps on today?
Marilyn Cohodas
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50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
11/10/2014 | 3:43:24 PM
Re: What can you control?
It's  hard for me to imagine getting 100 percent compliance with anything. So anything that moves the needle in the right direction would seem to make sense to me..
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