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Application Security

2/20/2019
10:30 AM
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The Anatomy of a Lazy Phish

A security engineer breaks down how easy it is for unskilled attackers to trick an unsuspecting user to submit credentials to a phishing site.
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CurtisBrazzell
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CurtisBrazzell,
User Rank: Author
2/27/2019 | 5:11:39 PM
Trend of Lazy Phishing
It's interesting that while in some ways, Phishing is becoming more advanced but on the other side of the same coin I continue to see lazy phishing such as this one during Incident Response investigations.  So many of them use frameworks that are meant to be deployed and then destroyed.  While investigating, it's not uncommon to see directory listing and other web service configuration issues that allow the responder to see captured credentials, etc.  Sites such as https://phishapi.com are a great way to quickly spin up a fake looking landing page which alerts when credentials are captured, so there's really no excuse for lazy phishing with today's toolsets.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2019 | 8:11:06 PM
Krebs FTW
> "Terms such as "phishtank," "google," "trendmicro," and "sucuri.net" in the client hostname will result in the exploit kit sending the client to a 404 Not Found page rather than the impersonated Microsoft login site."

I remember reading some time ago of malicious sites that scan for files with certain keywords in them to achieve this same goal.

One of the terms, funnily enough, was "brian krebs".
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