Application Security

6/27/2018
09:00 AM
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IEEE Calls for Strong Encryption

Newly issued position statement by the organization declares backdoor and key-escrow schemes could have 'negative consequences.'

The IEEE this week issued a position statement in support of strong encryption and in opposition to government efforts to require backdoors.

"IEEE supports the use of unfettered strong encryption to protect confidentiality and integrity of data and communications. We oppose efforts by governments to restrict the use of strong encryption and/or to mandate exceptional access mechanisms such as 'backdoors' or 'key escrow schemes' in order to facilitate government access to encrypted data," the organization's statement reads.

Backdoors and key escrow apporaches would open the door for vulnerabilities and other negative impacts on encryption, according to the IEEE. Law enforcement has other options besides backdoors, including legal action, forensic analysis, and requiring suspects to hand over keys and passwords, it said.

Read the full statement here

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RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
6/29/2018 | 2:38:47 PM
IEEE supports the use of unfettered strong encryption to protect confidentiality and integrity of data and communications
Good to see the IEEE is taking a stand to support data protection. Regardless of which side of the fence you fall on, if you support the core CIA principles you realize that strong encryption is the answer. And you can't have strong data protections if you are storing the keys in many locations.
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
6/29/2018 | 2:36:10 PM
Backdoors and key escrow apporaches
This defeats the purpose of encryption. If there is a need for this data by the government then due process should be followed to work with the provider of the data to decrypt. It is ill advised to have the government always have the keys to your house, no matter how good their intentions may be.
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