Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Application Security //

DevOps

1/21/2019
08:15 AM
Larry Loeb
Larry Loeb
Larry Loeb
50%
50%

Microsoft Looks to Squash Bugs in its Azure DevOps Product

Microsoft's latest bug-hunting program is targeting the company's Azure DevOps platform, which looks to make software development more secure.

Microsoft has created a Bug Bounty program for its Azure DevOps product. Redmond will offer bounties of up to $20,000 for flaws that are eligible under its guidelines.

As part of the January 17 announcement, Microsoft noted that the program would apply to Azure DevOps Services -- formerly Visual Studio Team Services -- online, as well as the latest publicly available versions of Azure DevOps Server and Team Foundation Server.

The program will pay rewards from $500 all the way up to $20,000 depending on the severity of the problem that is described.

At its heart, Azure DevOps is a cloud service which was launched in 2018, and designed to allow collaboration on code development. The DevOps tag highlights that it focuses on all the phases that are part of the development lifecycle.

DevOps has become a broad paintbrush of a term to describe a higher velocity of development activities, which has become the goal for many enterprises trying to respond to market forces in a dynamic manner. It consists of many serial cycles of development, deployment and automated testing that increases the pace of product releases.

With this program, Microsoft hopes to discover vulnerabilities that have a direct and verifiable impact on the security of its DevOps customers.

"Security has always been a passion of mine, and I see this program as a natural complement to our existing security framework," Buck Hodges, Microsoft's Director of Engineering for Azure DevOps, noted in the announcement. "We'll continue to employ careful code reviews and examine the security of our infrastructure. We'll still run our security scanning and monitoring tools. And we'll keep assembling a red team on a regular basis to attack our own systems to identify weaknesses."

Hodges thinks that the rewards will help motivate researchers to find security vulnerabilities in the DevOps services and allow corrections to be made to them before they're exploited by attackers. It also seems that Microsoft wants you to know that the new program won't be replacing their own security efforts.

The bug bounty program is looking for these kinds of vulnerabilities:

  • Cross site scripting (XXS)
  • Cross site request forgery (CSRF)
  • Cross-tenant data tampering or access
  • Insecure direct object references
  • Insecure deserialization
  • Injection vulnerabilities
  • Server-side code execution
  • Significant security misconfiguration (when not caused by user)
  • Using component with known vulnerabilities
  • Unauthorized cross-tenant data tampering or access

The company guidelines also state that vulnerabilities based on user configuration or action will not be considered as inbounds for program purposes. This includes:

  • Vulnerabilities based on user-generated content
  • Vulnerabilities requiring extensive or unlikely user actions
  • Security misconfiguration of a service by a user, such as the enabling of HTTP access on a storage account to allow for man-in-the-middle (MiTM) attacks
  • Missing HTTP Security Headers (such as X-FRAME-OPTIONS) or cookie security flags (such as "httponly")

Vulnerabilities due to third parties are also considered as out-of-bounds for program purposes, along with other classes of vulnerabilities including:

  • Server-side information disclosure
  • Denial of service (DoS) attacks
  • Cookie replay vulnerabilities
  • Vulnerabilities used to enumerate or confirm the existence of users or tenants

This type of program is Microsoft's signal that its security virtue is to be applauded, and it also extends the company's recent actions in implementing bug bounties for its other products, including Microsoft Account and Azure Active Directory.

Related posts:

— Larry Loeb has written for many of the last century's major "dead tree" computer magazines, having been, among other things, a consulting editor for BYTE magazine and senior editor for the launch of WebWeek.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Threaded  |  Newest First  |  Oldest First
COVID-19: Latest Security News & Commentary
Dark Reading Staff 8/3/2020
Pen Testers Who Got Arrested Doing Their Jobs Tell All
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  8/5/2020
New 'Nanodegree' Program Provides Hands-On Cybersecurity Training
Nicole Ferraro, Contributing Writer,  8/3/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal, a Dark Reading Perspective
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
The Changing Face of Threat Intelligence
The Changing Face of Threat Intelligence
This special report takes a look at how enterprises are using threat intelligence, as well as emerging best practices for integrating threat intel into security operations and incident response. Download it today!
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-15058
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-07
Lindy 42633 4-Port USB 2.0 Gigabit Network Server 2.078.000 devices allow an attacker on the same network to elevate privileges because the administrative password can be discovered by sniffing unencrypted UDP traffic.
CVE-2020-15059
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-07
Lindy 42633 4-Port USB 2.0 Gigabit Network Server 2.078.000 devices allow an attacker on the same network to bypass authentication via a web-administration request that lacks a password parameter.
CVE-2020-15060
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-07
Lindy 42633 4-Port USB 2.0 Gigabit Network Server 2.078.000 devices allow an attacker on the same network to conduct persistent XSS attacks by leveraging administrative privileges to set a crafted server name.
CVE-2020-15061
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-07
Lindy 42633 4-Port USB 2.0 Gigabit Network Server 2.078.000 devices allow an attacker on the same network to denial-of-service the device via long input values.
CVE-2020-15062
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-07
DIGITUS DA-70254 4-Port Gigabit Network Hub 2.073.000.E0008 devices allow an attacker on the same network to elevate privileges because the administrative password can be discovered by sniffing unencrypted UDP traffic.