Application Security
9/1/2017
11:00 AM
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CISOs' Salaries Expected to Edge Above $240,000 in 2018

Other IT security professionals may garner six-figure salaries as well, new report shows.

Rockstar CISOs are expected to land salary offers of $241,000 in 2018, putting them in the 95th percentile for CISO salary ranges, according to Robert Half Technology's 2018 Salary Guide released this week.

Meanwhile, CISOs in the 75th percentile salary range will likely see $204,000 in 2018, while the midpoint range will be $170,000 and the 25th percentile, $143,250, according to the report, which surveyed 740 human resource officials.

"Whether establishing a salary for a team member or trying to see where you stack up against your peers in the field, there are many factors that come into play" in salary offers, says John Reed, senior executive director of Robert Half Technology.

He noted a candidate's skills, experience, and the complexity of the role will all need to be taken into consideration when assessing which salary percentile is appropriate.

"The midpoint salary is a good indicator of someone who meets the requirements of an open role," Reed says.

The midpoint range for CISOs and information systems security managers have improved over the past couple of years. For example, the Dark Reading 2016 Security Salary Survey found the median annual salary of IT security management was $127,000.

But fast forward to 2018: the Robert Half Technology survey expects information systems security managers to earn as much as $194,250 if in the 95th percentile salary range, followed by $164,250 for the 75th percentile, $137,000 at the midpoint, and $115,250 at the 25th percentile, according to the report.

 

 

Source: Robert Half Technology

 

The salary increases expected next year are part of a trend that has been underway for the past few years, Reed says.

"We’ve seen security salaries growing relatively steadily in the past few years, especially as it has become increasingly difficult to find the talent to fill highly specialized roles," says Reed.

Twenty-two percent of CIOs say maintaining security of IT systems and safeguarding company information was their top concern, and this increased focus is driving the demand for talent, and in turn, salaries, he notes.

"Growing security initiatives have created an imbalance of supply and demand, especially for data and network security professionals who are seeing the compensation to match the complexity of safeguarding their organizations," Reed says.

Security professionals are likely to increase their marketability to prospective employers by completing these certification programs, Reed says.

Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP), Check Point Firewall administration, Cisco network administration, and LINUX/UNIX administration are some of the most frequently required or preferred certifications for security professionals, he says.

"These reputable certifications are good indicators of technically proficient talent. Certifications, especially in the ever-changing and evolving area of security, demonstrate a dedication to the field and the thirst for being on the cutting edge of a profession that requires you to constantly be one step ahead of potential threats," Reed says.

Related Content:

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Dawn Kawamoto is an Associate Editor for Dark Reading, where she covers cybersecurity news and trends. She is an award-winning journalist who has written and edited technology, management, leadership, career, finance, and innovation stories for such publications as CNET's ... View Full Bio

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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
9/22/2017 | 11:31:20 PM
Re: Acronym truth
@cybersavior: Clever! And apt. CISOs are often hired to be scapegoats more than anything else -- as an insurance policy in the form of a sacrificial lamb with which to appease the regulators.
cybersavior
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cybersavior,
User Rank: Strategist
9/8/2017 | 2:53:39 PM
Acronym truth
As it's said, "Career Is Soon Over".
graciemilligan
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graciemilligan,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/8/2017 | 1:09:51 AM
Re: On Robert Half
Inspiring article, this one gives a good expectation on salary; we need more money to sustain in this world. Work hard to get good result and t provide better service. 
Joe Stanganelli
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50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
9/6/2017 | 7:09:59 PM
Re: On Robert Half
I once sat in the waiting room of a Robert Half many years ago waiting for a meeting with someone. I witnessed a man storm out of an office and have a yelling match with an employee. The disagreement had something to do with how he was being directed to fill out forms that he had already filled out repeatedly.

He stormed out, shouting that he would never work with them again, and to not contact him again.

I was baffled. I could understand being upset at bureaucracy, but I couldn't understand how a person hard up for a job could so cavalierly toss away an opportunity -- particularly as the Great Recession had freshly begun.

Now, being older and wiser, and knowing many people who have had working relationships with Robert Half (all of whom dearly regret it) and having heard their tales of woe, I completely understand that man's frustration that day.
REISEN1955
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REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
9/6/2017 | 3:46:27 PM
Re: On Robert Half
This series has gone off subject but your experience is indeed horrible.   
JRBuckley
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JRBuckley,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/6/2017 | 3:37:42 PM
Re: On Robert Half
My experience with TekSystems was nice and clean for many years until my last experience.  They called me up, said they had reviewed my information, and wanted to meet with me to discuss a new role with a local client.  It's their policy to meet with each candidate in person, the recruiter said via phone.  I pointed out the fact that I've met with them in-person many times over the years and even worked with them but they wouldn't take no for an answer.  So I met with them.  Turns out, the whole thing was fakeThere was no job.  None.  It was a sales mining exercise.  They wanted my references and any work I've done through other recruiting firms so they could mine them for business.  When I made it clear that I wasn't going to provide them people for their sales pitch, the recruiter got defensive.  "Well, you should know that our branch manager has a special talent and knows within seconds if the person is the right person for the job or not."   Turns out, I wasn't the "right fit" for the fake job they didn't really have in the first place.
REISEN1955
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REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
9/6/2017 | 1:56:25 PM
On Robert Half
I have found them to be the most difficult people to get in touch with, contact or align one for a contract job in the world.  It is as if they DO NOT WANT to do business with you.  I have met some good reps in their offices and they always LEAVE for another job somewhere else.  I  have found TEKSYSTEMS to be fair and honest.  Their reps are fantastic and go the extra mile. 
JRBuckley
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JRBuckley,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/4/2017 | 7:35:07 PM
Re: Seems quite high
There is a rule about working for Robert Half as a consultant.  Robert Half takes HALF.  It sounds like a joke, but it's actually not.  No one is laughing, especially the person that is doing all the work.
Joe Stanganelli
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50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
9/2/2017 | 1:36:06 PM
Seems quite high
I'd be interested to know more about the methodology and sourcing of this study, because I find this highly dubious. In my experience (which, I grant, is anecdotal#, CISO and CISO-like roles are being undervalued.

#Plus, FWIW, and ad hominem as the point may be, as somebody who knows TONS of people who have worked with Robert Half, I don't know anybody who has the slightest good thing to say about that company except people who work at Robert Half.)
JRBuckley
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0%
JRBuckley,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/1/2017 | 1:57:55 PM
CISO Salaries Expected to... meanwhile...
Executive teams in multiple industries struggle to comprehend what a CISO does and equates the job itself as an "IT Problem", thus are setup for reporting into the IT Department, straining the IT budget, with very limited resources, tools, and ability to do their job.  What sounds like a ridiculous idea actually becomes reality when the IT Manager or even the person on the helpdesk is gloriously promoted to "Pseudo CISO" with none of the governance, real responsibilities of such a role, very limited visibility with regards to the business, and of course ALL the blame when things go terribly wrong due to a decision by the CCBDO "Chief Catastrophically Bad Decisions Officer".  The Board of Directors and Executive Leadership team shy completely away from calling the role a true CISO role by giving the position pet names like, "ISO" or "IT Security Manager" to lessen its overall influence.  Never mind the conflict of interests that present when the department you're auditing is the same department that controls your workload, priorities, and budget.  Meanwhile, the "Pseudo CISO" then is tasked with tackling a field he knows little about, told to check the boxes of compliance, and then held fully accountable when they are compromised aka fired.  In my line of work, I see this VERY often and there is no surprise at the amount of breaches we're seeing because of this mentality.  Many eTeams wish to spend as little money on security as possible and avoid a real CISO at all costs.
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