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Application Security

3/21/2019
05:15 PM
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Checkmarx to Secure Software Development at DOE National Laboratory

Checkmarx's Software Security Platform will be integrated into software development lifecycle at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

NEW YORK — Checkmarx, the Software Exposure Platform for the enterprise, today announced that the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory awarded a multi-year contract, based on a competitive procurement process, to Technology Solutions Provider, Inc. (TSPi), a Checkmarx certified partner and small business supplier, for the integration of Checkmarx’s software security platform into PNNL’s software development life cycle.

As PNNL transitions into a DevOps centric environment, Checkmarx’s static analysis solution, Static Application Security Testing (CxSAST), will help identify security vulnerabilities in both custom code and open source components. Additionally, Checkmarx Open Source Analysis (OSA) will help manage, control and prevent security risks and legal implications introduced by open source components, while developers’ application security skills will be regularly refreshed using CxCodebashing.

“Cyberattacks against organizations can take several forms, but attacks against software are the number one threat. As more organizations look to take on a DevOps centric approach, securing the entire software development life cycle is critical to ensuring a successful transition. This is where Checkmarx comes in, providing peace of mind, seamless integration and continuous education, while remaining easy to use across the organization,” said Rich Wajsgras, vice president of Federal Sales, Checkmarx. “We’re thrilled to have the opportunity to work with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and look forward to the innovation to come.”

PNNL was looking to enhance its security posture by integrating application security testing tools into its software development life cycle and provide on demand training to software developers. This included a Static Application Security Testing (SAST) tool to scan proprietary code for security vulnerabilities, a Software Composition Analysis (SCA) tool to identify open source components in use within an application and their known security vulnerabilities, and a secure coding training platform for application developers.

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory draws on signature capabilities in chemistry, earth sciences and data analytics to advance scientific discovery and create solutions to the nation's toughest challenges in energy resiliency and national security. Founded in 1965, PNNL is operated by Battelle Memorial Institute, the Pacific Northwest Division for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. DOE's Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, visit PNNL's News Center. Follow us on FacebookInstagramLinkedIn and Twitter.

About Checkmarx

Checkmarx is the Software Exposure Platform for the enterprise. Over 1,400 organizations around the globe rely on Checkmarx to measure and manage software risk at the speed of DevOps. Checkmarx serves five of the world’s top 10 software vendors, four of the top American banks, and many government organizations and Fortune 500 enterprises, including SAP, Samsung, and Salesforce.com. Learn more at Checkmarx.com.

Media Contacts 

Checkmarx

Christy Lynch [email protected]

InkHouse for Checkmarx Jessica Bettencourt [email protected]

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