Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Threat Intelligence

7/15/2014
04:00 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Automobile Industry Accelerates Into Security

Industry looking at intelligence-sharing platform or an Auto-ISAC in anticipation of more automated, connected -- and vulnerable -- vehicles.

Another day, another ISAC -- and this time it's the automobile industry.

The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers and the Association of Global Automakers today officially announced plans to address growing concerns over security weaknesses and vulnerabilities in new and evolving vehicle automation and networking features that could put cars at risk for nefarious hacking. The industry is in the process of forming a voluntary mechanism for sharing intelligence on security threats and vulnerabilities in car electronics and in-vehicle data networks -- likely via an Auto-ISAC (Information Sharing and Analysis Center), the officials say.

The auto industry's move toward an ISAC comes on the heels of that of the retail and oil and natural gas industries, which recently formed ISACs for their respective industries. While retail and oil & natural gas have faced a wave of real-world threats and attacks on their systems, carmakers for the most part so far have been mostly faced with research demonstrating possible attacks. The heat is on, however, because by 2017, more than 60% of new vehicles will be connected to the Internet, auto industry officials say.

Researchers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek last year at the DEF CON hacker conference elicited some nervous laughter among attendees as they showed witty but sobering evidence on video of how they were able to hack and take control of the electronic smart steering, braking, acceleration, engine, and other functions of the 2010 Toyota Prius and the 2010 Ford Escape. Their research follows that of 2011 work by the University of Washington and the University of California-San Diego, where academic researchers found ways to hack car features via Bluetooth and rogue CDs, among other tricks.

Miller and Valasek's work was about looking at what could be done if a bad guy hacker could get inside the car's internal network, and they also released their tools during the conference to help promote further study of vehicle vulnerabilities.

The researchers didn't get much response from Ford and Toyota, despite providing the carmakers with their white paper on their research and reaching out to the companies.

[The Retail Industry Leaders Association (RILA) rolls out a retail ISAC following the National Retail Federation's (NRF) announcement of an intel-sharing platform. Read Dual Retail Cyber threat Intelligence-Sharing Efforts Emerge.]

But today's announcement -- which was made at a press briefing at this week's Cyber Auto Challenge security event, where students work with automakers and government agencies on secure system design and programming as well as hands-on application -- appears to be a big step forward for the auto industry when it comes to factoring in the cyber security implications of new car features and functions. Ford and Toyota are both members of the Alliance for Automobile Manufacturers, and Toyota is also a member of the Association of Global Automakers.

Rob Strassburger, vice president of vehicle safety and harmonization at the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, says the goal of the first phase, a cyber security policy working group, is to provide an interim forum for security researchers to share their findings. "Longer-term, we'll be doing the work of governance and scope that would lead to an ISAC to look at vulnerabilities, assess them, and issue alerts," Strassburger says. "All actionable information our members then act upon."

Left to right: Rob Strassburger, vice president of vehicle safety and harmonization at the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers;  Mike Cammisa, director of safety at the Association of Global Automakers; Lisa McCauley, vice president and general manager of Battelle Cyber Innovations;  Andrew Brown Jr, vice president and chief technologist, Delphi Automotive PLC; Karl Heimer, director of Battelle Center for Advanced Vehicle Environments
Left to right: Rob Strassburger, vice president of vehicle safety and harmonization at the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers; Mike Cammisa, director of safety at the Association of Global Automakers; Lisa McCauley, vice president and general manager of Battelle Cyber Innovations; Andrew Brown Jr, vice president and chief technologist, Delphi Automotive PLC; Karl Heimer, director of Battelle Center for Advanced Vehicle Environments

Even so, Miller says he and Valasek were not part of the discussions that apparently led up to the plans for intelligence- and threat-sharing in the auto industry. "Anything that helps shed light on the security issues in the auto industry is nice although I think, as a researcher, the problem isn't in sharing our research but rather in getting manufacturers to make changes based on it," Miller said in an email exchange. "We have had no problem getting our research out in the media, etc., but I don't necessarily think the industry has been particularly responsive to the changes we've suggested they take, or if they have been, they haven't included us in the discussion.  I tend to think the industry thinks they know what they are doing and don't necessarily need outside help from folks like us."

The working group will look at a formalized Auto-ISAC or other type of program for sharing intel, says Mike Cammisa, director of safety at the Association of Global Automakers. "We will exchange vehicle-related cyber security information" among automakers, their suppliers, and government agencies as well, he said. "The goal is to continue to enhance the driving experience while maintaining the integrity of these systems."

Andrew Brown, vice president and chief technologist at Delphi Automotive PLC, a components supplier to automotive systems, says cyber security threats are bound to increase over time, as more automation and connectivity is added to vehicles. "As such, that represents an increased opportunity for those who may want to do harm to vehicles and the systems we provide," he said. "As a tier 1 supplier, we recognize we alone can't develop solutions and approaches to mitigate threats... It's important to have an industry-wide approach to cyber security issues, and it has to be initiated with the OEMs."

Valasek says car manufacturers and their suppliers tend to be a fairly closed group. "While getting a consortium started is good, the real battle is what to do upon a breach. Pretending like they can develop a perfect system without flaws isn't the answer," he said in an email exchange. There's no such thing as a bug-free system, he says.

 

Kelly Jackson Higgins is the Executive Editor of Dark Reading. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Oldest First  |  Newest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
GonzSTL
50%
50%
GonzSTL,
User Rank: Ninja
7/16/2014 | 9:52:35 AM
Automobile cyber security
A while back, I saw a video demonstrating the takeover of an automobile's electronic control systems via a cell phone. That was rather scary! I imagined myself driving a "connected" car, listening to music I had previously downloaded from the internet and saved to portable media (CD, USB drive, SD card, smartphone, etc.) that was plugged in to my car audio system, without knowing that the music file I downloaded contained a remote access trojan designed for automobile systems. Additionally, by sheer coincidence another driver in a similar situation happened to share the same road, and was headed towards me. What if both trojans were controlled by the same bad guy? It is not difficult to envision other nasty scenarios regarding automobile cyber security.

Automobile computer environments are really just a microcosm of IT infrastructures we see in organizations. They are comprised of multiple computers, each with their own functions, and most of them communicate with each other via a data network. Shouldn't we see proper segmentation and layered security within those automobile computer systems, in the same way we see them in our organizational computing environments? I realize that additional layers of security incur additional expense, and impact automated decisions cricital in the safe operation of the vehicle, but certainly the scenario above, and other, more potentially damaging scenarios justify the need.

I certainly hope that automobile systems security isn't treated in the same way that King Roland secured their "air shield", prompting Dark Helmet's comment "So the combination is... one, two, three, four, five? That's the stupidest combination I've ever heard in my life! That's the kind of thing an idiot would have on his luggage!"
Kelly Jackson Higgins
50%
50%
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
7/16/2014 | 9:57:06 AM
Re: Automobile cyber security
Your concerns and questions are spot on, @GonzSTL. No specifics yet from the auto industry folks on just how they plan to secure, fix, and address vulns in these current and future automation and networked features, but it is a crucial endeavor. I am looking forward to seeing how the auto industry ultimately works with security researchers, etc., because more and more of them are scrutinizing auto technologies for vulns.
Beau Woods
50%
50%
Beau Woods,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/16/2014 | 10:34:42 AM
How do researchers interface with the group
I'm excited to hear the news that the Auto Industry is getting more proactive about security issues, especially those which can affect human life and public safety. Is there any indication of how security researchers interface with the ISAC? For instance, will the group help coordinate disclosures with the broader industry? Will they solicit recommendations for improving security from researchers and get those to the automakers themselves? 

I'm part of a growing group of security researchers called I Am The Cavalry and we are pushing for exactly these sorts of collaborations between the research community and manufacturers. So far the people we have talked to in those organizations have been interested in working together but there are few mechanisms to do so. Hopefully this ISAC can serve some of that function.
Kelly Jackson Higgins
50%
50%
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
7/16/2014 | 10:47:17 AM
Re: How do researchers interface with the group
No details yet, Beau, but I will be following its progress. Thank you for sharing your thoughts.

I am very familiar with I Am The Cavalry--as a matter of fact, I wrote about it last year when all of the consumer device hacks were coming out at Black Hat & DEF CON: http://www.darkreading.com/attacks-breaches/lost-in-translation-hackers-hacking-consumer-devices/d/d-id/1140272

 

 
Whoopty
50%
50%
Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
7/16/2014 | 11:10:51 AM
Remote theft
Something I think could become a problem in years to come when automated vehicles are commonplace, is someone remotely taking control and driving it away from your home while you're asleep, or after you've left it in the car park. 
eaglei52
50%
50%
eaglei52,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/16/2014 | 1:24:48 PM
Time to start system hardening now....
One of the first areas to secure is the ECU interface port; the connector under the drivers knee used to  measure emissions via computer status codes. It's wide open to anyone.  The software and connector cables are pc friendly and widely available for next to nothing and on car forums there's abundant instruction on modifying built in functions (e.g. how long headlights stay on after shutoff, programming a new chip key, etc.)  A perfect place to infect in ways limited by only imagination. This physical access alone is enough to take action to harden; let us hope it's already begun.
theb0x
50%
50%
theb0x,
User Rank: Ninja
7/16/2014 | 1:36:11 PM
Re: Automobile cyber security
What exactly is the benefit of automated computer systems in a vehicle besides people being lazy?

Automatic transmission, power door locks, power windows, powered trunk latch, power seats, power seatbelts, cruise control, eco boost, launch control, xdrive, parking assist, ........ brake systems are no longer mechanically controlled. This absolutly disgusts me. How many recalls have there been that require firmware upgrades to fix the problem? Firmware should have nothing to do with a vehicle's brakes. This is why I refuse to buy a new vehicle. I will always have more control and I certainly don't need a computer to tell me my gas cap is loose.
supersat
50%
50%
supersat,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/16/2014 | 5:22:47 PM
Re: Automobile cyber security
The first ECUs were for fuel efficiency and emissions control. Now a lot of ECUs provide several critical safety features -- anti-lock brakes, stability control, tire pressure monitoring, airbags, etc. As a side note, a lot of automatic transmissions are implemented with hydraulics that determine when and how to shift.
Marilyn Cohodas
50%
50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
7/17/2014 | 9:03:47 AM
Re: Automobile cyber security
Another argument is that the majority of accidents are caused by operator error and that more vehicular automation -- including self-driving cars -- would be safer than what we have now. That's a nice thought, though I shudder to think about what hackers would do in that truly mobile environment. 
Robert McDougal
50%
50%
Robert McDougal,
User Rank: Ninja
7/18/2014 | 11:50:54 AM
Re: Automobile cyber security
I for one believe self driving cars are inevitable and a good thing for everyone but local police departments.  However, if auto manufacturers do not take security serious then we may all be in for a bumpy ride.
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
A Realistic Threat Model for the Masses
Lysa Myers, Security Researcher, ESET,  10/9/2019
USB Drive Security Still Lags
Dark Reading Staff 10/9/2019
Virginia a Hot Spot For Cybersecurity Jobs
Jai Vijayan, Contributing Writer,  10/9/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
7 Threats & Disruptive Forces Changing the Face of Cybersecurity
This Dark Reading Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at the biggest emerging threats and disruptive forces that are changing the face of cybersecurity today.
Flash Poll
2019 Online Malware and Threats
2019 Online Malware and Threats
As cyberattacks become more frequent and more sophisticated, enterprise security teams are under unprecedented pressure to respond. Is your organization ready?
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-17612
PUBLISHED: 2019-10-15
An issue was discovered in 74CMS v5.2.8. There is a SQL Injection generated by the _list method in the Common/Controller/BackendController.class.php file via the index.php?m=Admin&c=Ad&a=category sort parameter.
CVE-2019-17613
PUBLISHED: 2019-10-15
qibosoft 7 allows remote code execution because do/jf.php makes eval calls. The attacker can use the Point Introduction Management feature to supply PHP code to be evaluated. Alternatively, the attacker can access admin/index.php?lfj=jfadmin&action=addjf via CSRF, as demonstrated by a payload in...
CVE-2019-17395
PUBLISHED: 2019-10-15
In the Rapid Gator application 0.7.1 for Android, the username and password are stored in the log during authentication, and may be available to attackers via logcat.
CVE-2019-17602
PUBLISHED: 2019-10-15
An issue was discovered in Zoho ManageEngine OpManager before 12.4 build 124089. The OPMDeviceDetailsServlet servlet is prone to SQL injection. Depending on the configuration, this vulnerability could be exploited unauthenticated or authenticated.
CVE-2019-17394
PUBLISHED: 2019-10-15
In the Seesaw Parent and Family application 6.2.5 for Android, the username and password are stored in the log during authentication, and may be available to attackers via logcat.