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3/22/2019
02:30 PM
Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
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Inside Incident Response: 6 Key Tips to Keep in Mind

Experts share the prime window for detecting intruders, when to contact law enforcement, and what they wish they did differently after a breach.
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Communication Control: Have a Plan in Place
The desire to be less transparent following a breach can backfire, said Code42 CISO Jadee Hanson, who was working in a security role at Target when it was hit with a massive breach in 2013. A lack of prepared communication is a common problem with incident response.
'The biggest thing I feel is very much overlooked is controlling communication and having a set communication in place if something terrible happens,' she explained. Target was hesitant to be fully transparent following the 2013 breach; as a result, people filled in the gaps on their own.
'There was a lot of speculation that wasn't real that ended up swirling out of control, to the point where we couldn't get back the story,' Hanson said. Companies are now much more transparent in disclosing security incidents and updating customers as they have more info. It's still a tricky process to navigate, though, especially in the immediate aftermath of a breach.
'Often when you're working with a breach, you're dealing with partial information,' Hanson noted. Getting a C-level executive to say 'I don't know' and maintain credibility is a delicate balance.
(Image: Rawpixel.com - stock.adobe.com)

Communication Control: Have a Plan in Place

The desire to be less transparent following a breach can backfire, said Code42 CISO Jadee Hanson, who was working in a security role at Target when it was hit with a massive breach in 2013. A lack of prepared communication is a common problem with incident response.

"The biggest thing I feel is very much overlooked is controlling communication and having a set communication in place if something terrible happens," she explained. Target was hesitant to be fully transparent following the 2013 breach; as a result, people filled in the gaps on their own.

"There was a lot of speculation that wasn't real that ended up swirling out of control, to the point where we couldn't get back the story," Hanson said. Companies are now much more transparent in disclosing security incidents and updating customers as they have more info. It's still a tricky process to navigate, though, especially in the immediate aftermath of a breach.

"Often when you're working with a breach, you're dealing with partial information," Hanson noted. Getting a C-level executive to say "I don't know" and maintain credibility is a delicate balance.

(Image: Rawpixel.com stock.adobe.com)

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CharlieDoesThings
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CharlieDoesThings,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/25/2019 | 10:22:21 AM
6 more tips I could use
Well done with the post, I really enjoyed the tips.
StephenGiderson
50%
50%
StephenGiderson,
User Rank: Strategist
4/26/2019 | 1:16:33 AM
Who should we help?
OF course bigger businesses are going to be better prepared when it comes to disaster and external attacks. But they are also more than capable of affording the ramifications of such a situation whereas the smaller guys will struggle. So who really needs the help?
DevSecOps: The Answer to the Cloud Security Skills Gap
Lamont Orange, Chief Information Security Officer at Netskope,  11/15/2019
Attackers' Costs Increasing as Businesses Focus on Security
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  11/15/2019
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