Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Analytics

5/30/2018
02:45 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

FireEye Offers Free Tool to Detect Malicious Remote Logins

Open source GeoLogonalyzer helps to weed out hackers exploiting stolen credentials to log into their targets.

FireEye today released an open source tool called GeoLogonalyzer for catching remote logins from hackers.

Stolen enterprise user credentials are all the rage among hackers these days, but spotting the bad guys among legitimate users logging in remotely can be difficult due to the large volume of remote access links to an organization.

David Pany, senior consultant at Mandiant, a FireEye company, says the tool helps analyze logs to spot geographically infeasible logins: flagging a New York-based user logging in at 13:00 and a few minutes later connecting to a VPN from Australia, for example. "Once remote authentication activity is baselined across an environment, analysts can begin to identify authentication activity that deviates from business requirements and normalized patterns," Pany said in a blog post today announcing the new free tool.

Other anomalies that could indicate hackers are logging in include user accounts registered to a single physical location that have logons from locations where the user is not likely to be sitting, as well as logons from different source-host names or via multiple VPN clients.

FireEye recommends several best practices for thwarting remote access hacks in addition to deploying GeoLogonalyzer, including limiting remote access from the Internet to sensitive data; instituting multifactor authentication using one-time tokens; and whitelisting legit IP address ranges for remote access users, among other steps.

GeoLogonalyzer is available under the Apache License 2.0 here via GitHub.

Related Content:

Kelly Jackson Higgins is the Executive Editor of Dark Reading. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Threaded  |  Newest First  |  Oldest First
Data Leak Week: Billions of Sensitive Files Exposed Online
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  12/10/2019
Lessons from the NSA: Know Your Assets
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  12/12/2019
4 Tips to Run Fast in the Face of Digital Transformation
Shane Buckley, President & Chief Operating Officer, Gigamon,  12/9/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
The Year in Security: 2019
This Tech Digest provides a wrap up and overview of the year's top cybersecurity news stories. It was a year of new twists on old threats, with fears of another WannaCry-type worm and of a possible botnet army of Wi-Fi routers. But 2019 also underscored the risk of firmware and trusted security tools harboring dangerous holes that cybercriminals and nation-state hackers could readily abuse. Read more.
Flash Poll
Rethinking Enterprise Data Defense
Rethinking Enterprise Data Defense
Frustrated with recurring intrusions and breaches, cybersecurity professionals are questioning some of the industrys conventional wisdom. Heres a look at what theyre thinking about.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-19797
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-15
read_colordef in read.c in Xfig fig2dev 3.2.7b has an out-of-bounds write.
CVE-2019-5252
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-14
There is an improper authentication vulnerability in Huawei smartphones (Y9, Honor 8X, Honor 9 Lite, Honor 9i, Y6 Pro). The applock does not perform a sufficient authentication in a rare condition. Successful exploit could allow the attacker to use the application locked by applock in an instant.
CVE-2019-5235
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-14
Some Huawei smart phones have a null pointer dereference vulnerability. An attacker crafts specific packets and sends to the affected product to exploit this vulnerability. Successful exploitation may cause the affected phone to be abnormal.
CVE-2019-5264
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-13
There is an information disclosure vulnerability in certain Huawei smartphones (Mate 10;Mate 10 Pro;Honor V10;Changxiang 7S;P-smart;Changxiang 8 Plus;Y9 2018;Honor 9 Lite;Honor 9i;Mate 9). The software does not properly handle certain information of applications locked by applock in a rare condition...
CVE-2019-5277
PUBLISHED: 2019-12-13
Huawei CloudUSM-EUA V600R006C10;V600R019C00 have an information leak vulnerability. Due to improper configuration, the attacker may cause information leak by successful exploitation.