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Analytics

9/27/2017
07:00 AM
Dawn Kawamoto
Dawn Kawamoto
Slideshows

7 SIEM Situations That Can Sack Security Teams

SIEMs are considered an important tool for incident response, yet a large swath of users find seven major problems when working with SIEMs.
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Expenses are More Than Expected

Software licenses and hardware only cover one-third of SIEM costs, which comes as a surprise to many security professionals, says Jones.

Installation, configuration and maintenance account for another 34% of the expense, with staffing comprising 33%.

Solutions

"The traditional SIEM pricing models have focused on consumption pricing the more events processed, the higher the cost. This creates an incentive to not send all log events that may be necessary for good visibility to the SIEM", says Joseph Blankenship, a senior security and risk analyst at Forrester Research.

He added some SIEM vendors offer enterprise pricing models that address this pricing issue and suggests companies should ask their vendors if alternative pricing models are available to reduce license costs.

Enterprises should also review their log sources and determine whether they need to process all their log data in the SIEM, or whether it could be archived in another repository, Blankenship advises.

Chris Brazdziunas, LogRhythm's vice president of products, says SIEMs are perceived as too expensive and creates too many alarms that cause alarm fatigue, and that they are not well-adopted.

"It is important to invest appropriately up front when the SIEM is deployed, ensuring these challenges are not faced," she says. "A 100% deployed SIEM is one [from which] you can obtain metrics that are associated with the effectiveness of an enterprise security program, such as mean time to detect (MTTD) and mean time to respond (MTTR)."

Image Source: Cyphort

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donnaksmith
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donnaksmith,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/12/2017 | 3:22:56 PM
EXCELLENT!
Covers everything that I've run into!
LouiseMiller
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LouiseMiller,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/10/2017 | 9:13:16 AM
Great post
wow, what can I say 
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