Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Analytics

5/31/2018
09:00 AM
Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
Slideshows
Connect Directly
Twitter
LinkedIn
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

6 Security Investments You May Be Wasting

Not all tools and services provide the same value. Some relatively low-cost practices have a major payoff while some of the most expensive tools make little difference.
Previous
1 of 7
Next

(Image: Wutzkohphoto via Shutterstock)

(Image: Wutzkohphoto via Shutterstock)

Security budgets are growing and so are security costs, with drivers coming from all sides: data breaches that are more frequent and more expensive to remediate; preventative technologies that are costly to buy and maintain; and talent that remains both pricey and hard to find.

On a positive note, businesses today are better at understanding risks and allocating more of their attention and IT budgets (23%) to cybersecurity. Enterprises, as reported in new Kaspersky Lab research, believe their security budgets will grow by 15% over the next three years, as do businesses with less than 50 employees. SMBs are about the same, anticipating 14% growth in security spend by 2021, according to Kaspersky Lab.

But despite larger budgets, security teams still struggle to make ends meet. Increasingly advanced tools are expensive to buy and, oftentimes, more expensive to run. Enterprise victims allocate most ($193,000, on average) of their post-breach spending toward improving software and infrastructure, and SMBs hit with breaches spend $15,000 on the same expense, according to Kaspersky.

Maintaining advanced technology is also a challenge due to the growth of complex infrastructure and lack of both organizational and technical ability to manage it. More than one-third (34%) of organizations say the intricacy of IT systems is driving investments; the same amount say improving security expertise is a motivation to spend, according to Kaspersky.

The reason: many security technologies simply aren't worth their cost without the right resources to implement and run them, observes Tom Parker, group technology officer at Accenture Security. Oftentimes what Parker describes as "comfort purchasing" makes companies feel good about the money they spend on new technology and lures them into feeling confident they're making the right moves.

"The biggest concern I have, honestly, is ... [about the] false sense of security organizations often get by buying technology and not having a well-considered view of how that technology is performing in their environment," Parker adds.

Here, experts point to security technologies and processes that require more investment to be worth their cost. Not all tools and services provide the same value. Some relatively low-cost practices can have a major payoff; some of the most expensive tools make little difference.

Are there any components to your security strategy you felt haven't been worth their high cost? Feel free to add to the conversation in the comments.

 

Kelly Sheridan is the Staff Editor at Dark Reading, where she focuses on cybersecurity news and analysis. She is a business technology journalist who previously reported for InformationWeek, where she covered Microsoft, and Insurance & Technology, where she covered financial ... View Full Bio
 

Recommended Reading:

Previous
1 of 7
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Commentary
Ransomware Is Not the Problem
Adam Shostack, Consultant, Entrepreneur, Technologist, Game Designer,  6/9/2021
Edge-DRsplash-11-edge-ask-the-experts
How Can I Test the Security of My Home-Office Employees' Routers?
John Bock, Senior Research Scientist,  6/7/2021
News
New Ransomware Group Claiming Connection to REvil Gang Surfaces
Jai Vijayan, Contributing Writer,  6/10/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win an Amazon Gift Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: Google's new See No Evil policy......
Current Issue
The State of Cybersecurity Incident Response
In this report learn how enterprises are building their incident response teams and processes, how they research potential compromises, how they respond to new breaches, and what tools and processes they use to remediate problems and improve their cyber defenses for the future.
Flash Poll
How Enterprises are Developing Secure Applications
How Enterprises are Developing Secure Applications
Recent breaches of third-party apps are driving many organizations to think harder about the security of their off-the-shelf software as they continue to move left in secure software development practices.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2021-31664
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-18
RIOT-OS 2021.01 before commit 44741ff99f7a71df45420635b238b9c22093647a contains a buffer overflow which could allow attackers to obtain sensitive information.
CVE-2021-33185
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-18
SerenityOS contains a buffer overflow in the set_range test in TestBitmap which could allow attackers to obtain sensitive information.
CVE-2021-33186
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-18
SerenityOS in test-crypto.cpp contains a stack buffer overflow which could allow attackers to obtain sensitive information.
CVE-2021-31272
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-18
SerenityOS before commit 3844e8569689dd476064a0759d704bc64fb3ca2c contains a directory traversal vulnerability in tar/unzip that may lead to command execution or privilege escalation.
CVE-2021-31660
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-18
RIOT-OS 2021.01 before commit 85da504d2dc30188b89f44c3276fc5a25b31251f contains a buffer overflow which could allow attackers to obtain sensitive information.