Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

ABTV

10/24/2019
12:10 PM
Larry Loeb
Larry Loeb
Larry Loeb
50%
50%

Beware the 'Raccoon Stealer' – It Ain't No Furry Friend

'Raccoon stealer' is one of the 2019's top ten most-mentioned pieces of malware in the underground economy.

Cybereason, a Boston-based security firm, has been looking at underground forums since April of 2019. They say that malware they call "Raccoon stealer" is one of the 2019's top ten most-mentioned malware in the underground economy. They attribute it to Russian threat actors. They also saythat it has infected hundreds of thousands of devices around the world (including organizations and individuals in North America, Europe and Asia), despite it not being overly sophisticated or innovative. This is due, they think, to a growing trend of the commoditization of malware as the authors follow a MaaS (malware-as-a-service) model and evolve their efforts.

The malware is said to leverage several potential delivery methods. It can be delivered by an exploit kit (Fallout and RIG), by phishing, or by bundled malware. (Bundled means that a legitimate app's installer has been modified by some means to also install the malware.)

It has the ability to steal a large amount of data, such as credit card information, cryptocurrency wallets, browser data and email credentials.

Raccoon is also known as "Mohazo" or "Racealer." It has an easy-to-use automated backend panel, bulletproof hosting and 24/7 customer support in both Russian and English. As of this writing, it costs $200 per month to use. Cybereason says the malware's development team is quick, responsive and dedicated, using short development cycles to release updates, bug fixes and new features within days. They are also highly active in underground communities under the username raccoonstealer. They post daily and reply to community questions and comments within hours in underground forums and on Telegram.

Upon successful connection and verification of Raccoon's Bot ID, it downloads a compressed zip file with multiple different DLLs. These DLLs are not necessarily malicious on their own, but Raccoon depends on them to successfully collect and steal data on the target machine.\r\nLocal language settings are then examined. If the language is Russian, Ukrainian, Belarussian, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Armenian, Tajik or Uzbek the malware immediately aborts. This is typical of Russian-originated malware.

Raccoon collects system information from the infected machine, including username, IP address, language settings, OS version, information on installed apps, and CPU and memory information. Browser information is gotten from the SQLite database files on a local machine. Raccoon steals this information from over 30 different browser types. Also, Raccoon extracts information about Microsoft Outlook accounts from registry keys on the target machine.

Raccoon saves all stolen data to a zip file (gate.zip) and sends the information to its command and control (C2) server.\r\nAfter a successful exfiltration of all the sensitive data, Raccoon deletes its binary from the victim's machine.

As Cybereason puts it, "As malware authors choose to develop MaaS, they must partake in many of the same activities as a legitimate SaaS business: marketing efforts, relying on positive reviews, responsive customer support, and regularly improving features in their product. We only expect this trend to continue into 2020 and push the evolution of MaaS forward."

— Larry Loeb has written for many of the last century's major "dead tree" computer magazines, having been, among other things, a consulting editor for BYTE magazine and senior editor for the launch of WebWeek.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
COVID-19: Latest Security News & Commentary
Dark Reading Staff 9/25/2020
9 Tips to Prepare for the Future of Cloud & Network Security
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  9/28/2020
Attacker Dwell Time: Ransomware's Most Important Metric
Ricardo Villadiego, Founder and CEO of Lumu,  9/30/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
How IT Security Organizations are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
How IT Security Organizations are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
The COVID-19 pandemic turned the world -- and enterprise computing -- on end. Here's a look at how cybersecurity teams are retrenching their defense strategies, rebuilding their teams, and selecting new technologies to stop the oncoming rise of online attacks.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-20902
PUBLISHED: 2020-10-01
Upgrading Crowd via XML Data Transfer can reactivate a disabled user from OpenLDAP. The affected versions are from before version 3.4.6 and from 3.5.0 before 3.5.1.
CVE-2019-20903
PUBLISHED: 2020-10-01
The hyperlinks functionality in atlaskit/editor-core in before version 113.1.5 allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary HTML or JavaScript via a Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) vulnerability in link targets.
CVE-2020-25288
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-30
An issue was discovered in MantisBT before 2.24.3. When editing an Issue in a Project where a Custom Field with a crafted Regular Expression property is used, improper escaping of the corresponding form input's pattern attribute allows HTML injection and, if CSP settings permit, execution of arbitra...
CVE-2020-25781
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-30
An issue was discovered in file_download.php in MantisBT before 2.24.3. Users without access to view private issue notes are able to download the (supposedly private) attachments linked to these notes by accessing the corresponding file download URL directly.
CVE-2020-25830
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-30
An issue was discovered in MantisBT before 2.24.3. Improper escaping of a custom field's name allows an attacker to inject HTML and, if CSP settings permit, achieve execution of arbitrary JavaScript when attempting to update said custom field via bug_actiongroup_page.php.