Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Operations //

Identity & Access Management

A Year Later, Most Americans Think Snowden Did The Right Thing

On anniversary of whistleblowing, 55 percent of Americans say Snowden was right to expose NSA's surveillance program; 82 percent believe they are still being watched.

A year ago this week, contractor Edward Snowden published documents exposing the National Security Agency's PRISM program, which included online surveillance of US citizens. Was he justified in doing so? More than half of Americans believe he was.

According to a survey scheduled to be published this week by research firm YouGov and commissioned by security firm Tresorit, 55 percent of employed Americans believe Snowden was right to expose PRISM. Eighty-two percent believe their personal information is still being analyzed by the US government, and 81 percent believe their personal information is being analyzed by corporations for business purposes.

Nearly one in two employed Americans name constitutional rights as the reason for their support of Snowden’s exposure of PRISM: 44 percent of employed Americans cite their civil rights as key reasons that they support Snowden’s cause. Snowden supporters tend to be younger: Just 20 percent of young adults aged 16-34 believe Snowden’s actions were wrong, compared to 41 percent of adults aged 55 or older.

More than half of those surveyed (51 percent) don’t know if their employers have taken measures to ensure that corporate files are secure. Only 32 percent of respondents report that their employer has taken such steps.

Thirty-seven percent of employed Americans say they have not taken any steps in the last year to ensure personal digital security, according to the survey. Forty percent of employed Americans say they have created stronger passwords, while one in four (26%) have created different passwords for different online accounts.

Tim Wilson is Editor in Chief and co-founder of Dark Reading.com, UBM Tech's online community for information security professionals. He is responsible for managing the site, assigning and editing content, and writing breaking news stories. Wilson has been recognized as one ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
<<   <   Page 3 / 3
pdegenkolb941
50%
50%
pdegenkolb941,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/29/2014 | 11:53:32 AM
Snowden is a traitor
Talking Fourth Amendment is not relevant, as the information the NSA is gathering is (to a significant degree) already open.  The metadata on phone calls is already stored by the phone companies, and what the NSA collects is nothing compared to what Google (and many other private companies) collect and sell. (Only the NSA does not sell the data.)  Snowden lied to get his position, then with intent, stole classified and or sensitive information and then released it to a (many) foreign governments.  There is nothing good or proper or enlightened about what he did.


The problem with the NSA spying is not the agency, or the processes they use, it is the elected officials that misuse the information.  For the actions of the elected officials, we have only ourselves to blame.
Andre Leonard
0%
100%
Andre Leonard,
User Rank: Strategist
5/29/2014 | 11:34:11 AM
Re: Definitely the right thing!
Outstanding observation, summary and analysis. In the end, someone has to monitor the government for abuses. They cannot be left to monitor themselves. That's how we got into this mess.

 

 
Robert McDougal
100%
0%
Robert McDougal,
User Rank: Ninja
5/29/2014 | 10:26:39 AM
Definitely the right thing!
In my opinion, his actions were undoubtedly the right thing to do.  My reasoning is that the United States government was and continues to violate the 4th amendment of the constitution.  In essence, our government is willfully violating the law of the land.

The 4th amendment protects American citizens from unlawful search and seizure and sets forth the requirement of a judicial warrant issued based on probable cause.  Further case law (Katz v. United States) expanded the 4th amendment to protect citizens who "exhibit an actual expectation of privacy".  For example when I place a call to my friend I am exhibiting an expectation of privacy between my friend and myself.  Consequently, if I send an email to my friend, I should be exhibiting the same expectation of privacy, therefore any search and seizure of said email is in violation of the 4th amendment.

In my mind, the issue is as simple as that.  The US government is willfully violating a key civil right set forth in the constitution and we the citizens deserved to be made aware of that fact.
<<   <   Page 3 / 3
Mobile Banking Malware Up 50% in First Half of 2019
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  1/17/2020
Active Directory Needs an Update: Here's Why
Raz Rafaeli, CEO and Co-Founder at Secret Double Octopus,  1/16/2020
New Attack Campaigns Suggest Emotet Threat Is Far From Over
Jai Vijayan, Contributing Writer,  1/16/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
The Year in Security: 2019
This Tech Digest provides a wrap up and overview of the year's top cybersecurity news stories. It was a year of new twists on old threats, with fears of another WannaCry-type worm and of a possible botnet army of Wi-Fi routers. But 2019 also underscored the risk of firmware and trusted security tools harboring dangerous holes that cybercriminals and nation-state hackers could readily abuse. Read more.
Flash Poll
New Best Practices for Secure App Development
New Best Practices for Secure App Development
The transition from DevOps to SecDevOps is combining with the move toward cloud computing to create new challenges - and new opportunities - for the information security team. Download this report, to learn about the new best practices for secure application development.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-5216
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-23
In Secure Headers (RubyGem secure_headers), a directive injection vulnerability is present in versions before 3.9.0, 5.2.0, and 6.3.0. If user-supplied input was passed into append/override_content_security_policy_directives, a newline could be injected leading to limited header injection. Upon seei...
CVE-2020-5217
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-23
In Secure Headers (RubyGem secure_headers), a directive injection vulnerability is present in versions before 3.8.0, 5.1.0, and 6.2.0. If user-supplied input was passed into append/override_content_security_policy_directives, a semicolon could be injected leading to directive injection. This could b...
CVE-2020-5223
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-23
In PrivateBin versions 1.2.0 before 1.2.2, and 1.3.0 before 1.3.2, a persistent XSS attack is possible. Under certain conditions, a user provided attachment file name can inject HTML leading to a persistent Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability. The vulnerability has been fixed in PrivateBin v1.3...
CVE-2019-20399
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-23
A timing vulnerability in the Scalar::check_overflow function in Parity libsecp256k1-rs before 0.3.1 potentially allows an attacker to leak information via a side-channel attack.
CVE-2020-7915
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-22
An issue was discovered on Eaton 5P 850 devices. The Ubicacion SAI field allows XSS attacks by an administrator.