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Vulnerabilities / Threats

4/29/2019
04:00 PM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
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7 Types of Experiences Every Security Pro Should Have

As the saying goes, experience is the best teacher. It'll also make you a better and more well-rounded security pro.
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Image Source: Adobe Stock: lassedesignen

Image Source: Adobe Stock: lassedesignen

Whether it's a military network, an e-commerce site, or a nonprofit group, organizations are constantly under attack — and they're looking to their security teams to protect them.

So what types of skills and experiences do security pros need to develop to succeed? Being good at technology is a given — that's why they went into the field in the first place. In talking to seven security pros, what came up time and again was that they need to be good listeners and develop communication and business skills.  

It's time for security pros to ask themselves what's really important to them and their organizations, says Paul Kurtz, co-founder and CEO of TruStar.

"It's not always about adding new tools," he says. "In fact, we went through a period after the Target and Anthem hacks and all the other major hacks where security pros were just overlaying tools on top of one another. A lot of those tools became shelfware."

Of course, that doesn't mean security pros should stop learning and build new skills. Yet another way to learn is through experiencing different situations on the job. Following are seven types of experiences that will make you a better and more well-rounded security pro, whether you're a one-person operation or work in a large SOC.

[Hear Paul Kurtz, co-founder and CEO of TruStar, present Cybersecurity Crash Course, Day 2 at Interop 2019 next month]

 

Steve Zurier has more than 30 years of journalism and publishing experience and has covered networking, security, and IT as a writer and editor since 1992. Steve is based in Columbia, Md. View Full Bio
 

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gmax28
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gmax28,
User Rank: Strategist
5/10/2019 | 6:21:22 PM
Just not realistic...
The author is obviously not in the business of InfoSec.  Working in major enterprises for almost 20 years, you do your piece of the pie.  Rarely are there opportunities to learn other skills because your piece of the pie is quite large.  And shadowing an exec... yeah... ok.  Yes, InfoSec should understand the business aspects of IT just as much as the business should understand the importance of securing the environment.  

And to add to this, employers think that there are a plethora of experienced infosec guys out there and they make demands on "requirements" that just are not realistic.  Many times asking for what would equate to multiple jobs.  "Segregation of duties" anyone?  I had an HR person tell me that I was not considered because I performed the duties they were after more than 5 years ago.  Apparently they think that if you haven't done it lately, you clear your cache of any unused information.  I actually asked one HR person, " Did you forget how to ride a bike?"  She was stunned and didn't know how to answer that question. 

So this article is just another journalistic waste of time, and waste of my time perusing it.   Employers must consider a person's experience and allow some room for training/learning of new skills particular to their environment.  That's the only way you are going to get past a couple of skills unless you work for a very small company and are doing it all. 
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