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2/19/2019
11:35 AM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
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6 Tax Season Tips for Security Pros

Here are some practical ways to keep your company safe as Uncle Sam comes calling.
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1. Beware of Tax-Related Business Email Compromises
Business email compromises (BEC) are becoming increasly savvy, Masergy's Watson says. An example of a BEC during tax season would be a payroll administrator receiving an email supposedly from the CEO or a top official at the company asking to be sent all of the company's W2s or 1099s. Teach your payroll people to look out for common phishing scams. Today, the fraudsters especially like to use copycat domains or defunct domains that look real but aren't.
Michael Blache, CISO at TaxSlayer, advises companies to make it as difficult as possible for people to obtain company tax information. For example, if a person claims to be looking for an old W2, require that person to physically go to the payroll administrator's office. If somebody calls by phone, have that person send the last four digits of his Social Security number as well as a copy of a valid driver's license. Make it difficult for the fraudsters, and they will move on.
(Image: momius - Adobe Stock)

1. Beware of Tax-Related Business Email Compromises

Business email compromises (BEC) are becoming increasly savvy, Masergy's Watson says. An example of a BEC during tax season would be a payroll administrator receiving an email supposedly from the CEO or a top official at the company asking to be sent all of the company's W2s or 1099s. Teach your payroll people to look out for common phishing scams. Today, the fraudsters especially like to use copycat domains or defunct domains that look real but aren't.

Michael Blache, CISO at TaxSlayer, advises companies to make it as difficult as possible for people to obtain company tax information. For example, if a person claims to be looking for an old W2, require that person to physically go to the payroll administrator's office. If somebody calls by phone, have that person send the last four digits of his Social Security number as well as a copy of a valid driver's license. Make it difficult for the fraudsters, and they will move on.

(Image: momius Adobe Stock)

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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2019 | 8:50:45 PM
Re: Copycats
@REISEN: The funny thing is that these are the cleverer attackers!

Most of the time, they don't even bother -- and the email address and domain name look like something created by a password manager's PRNG engine.
REISEN1955
50%
50%
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2019 | 3:38:52 PM
Re: Copycats
Just received a spam email for reference F-ACEBOOK - easy to spot for the trained observer. 
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
2/23/2019 | 11:05:27 PM
Copycats
> fraudsters especially like to use copycat domains or defunct domains that look real but aren't.

This isn't limited to tax schemes. In the Anthem hack a few years back, central to that was the creation by hackers of copycat domain we11point[dot-com] instead of wellpoint[dot-com].
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