Vulnerabilities / Threats
1/3/2014
04:20 PM
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OpenSSL Says Breach Did Not Involve Corrupted Hypervisor

Hosting provider's compromised password system, not a hacked hypervisor, led to defacing of OpenSSL.org site, site reps say – after VMware cries foul.

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Stratustician
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Stratustician,
User Rank: Moderator
1/7/2014 | 2:37:33 PM
Locking down the hypervisor
I sadly think we are going to see lots of these types of incidents as ports are left open in virtual environments, as well as faulty SSL policies.  The real threat to the hypervisor will probably come from an unsecured VM being accessed and somehow the hypervisor is accessed, or through the management console.  In a private environment it's a scary thought, but in a public environment where multiple companies share the same hypervisor, it's the stuff that would keep security folks up at night.
asksqn
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asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
1/4/2014 | 6:24:06 PM
The Turkish hack was a just a dry run-
Next time, however, it is doubtful the next crop of hackers will be so warm/fuzzy.  Regardless, this is a breach that should underscore security is dynamic.  It is simply no longer enough to rest on the laurels of hard to hack 'nux distros and proclaim impregnability.
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/3/2014 | 7:13:51 PM
First it was, then it wasn't
I like the speedy resolution of this issue. There's bound to be some questions at a site as sensitive as OpenSSL when an incident occurs, and the site administrators were on the right track when they pointed toward the hosting service server, VMware had the courage of its convictions to say no, it was not the hypervisor, when OpenSSL first pointed in that direction, and indeed, it was password management on the hosting site. Multiple parties looking at the problem came up with the right answers quickly and pretty transparently. Salud.
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