Vulnerabilities / Threats
1/12/2010
10:29 AM
50%
50%

Kodak, Samsung End Patent Dispute

The settlement could lead to improved cameras in Samsung mobile phones.

Eastman Kodak and Samsung have entered into a cross licensing agreement that ends a digital camera patent dispute.

Kodak will collect royalties in the agreement, which "provides significant benefits to both companies," Kodak and Samsung said in a statement issued Monda by Kodak. No other financial details were disclosed.

As a result of the deal, the companies have asked the U.S. International Trade Commission to drop pending patent infringement proceedings. The companies are alos dropping pending lawsuits in U.S. and German courts. The licensing agreement takes effect upon approval by the ITC, which is expected at the end of the month.

Kodak filed the first claim with the U.S. International Trade Commission, accusing Samsung of infringing on Kodak's digital camera patents. The company was seeking a limited exclusion order preventing Samsung from importing infringing devices such as mobile phones.

"We are pleased to have reached a mutually beneficial arrangement that advances the interests of Kodak and Samsung and which validates the strength of Kodak's intellectual property portfolio," Laura G. Quatela, chief intellectual property officer for Kodak, said.

The settlement could lead to improved cameras in Samsung mobile phones. The company is the second-largest handset maker and picture-taking capabilities are increasingly become important differentiators in the handset market.

Sony Ericsson, for example, is hoping to boost its share in the U.S. market by introducing better cameras in its handsets. Apple touts the boosted camera capabilities in its latest iPhone as a differentiator. While it only packs a 3.2-megapixel lens, the iPhone 3GS can record video and has touch-to-focus capabilities.

Kodak and Samsung announced last month that they had agreed to negotiate a settlement in the patent dispute.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2015-4231
Published: 2015-07-03
The Python interpreter in Cisco NX-OS 6.2(8a) on Nexus 7000 devices allows local users to bypass intended access restrictions and delete an arbitrary VDC's files by leveraging administrative privileges in one VDC, aka Bug ID CSCur08416.

CVE-2015-4232
Published: 2015-07-03
Cisco NX-OS 6.2(10) on Nexus and MDS 9000 devices allows local users to execute arbitrary OS commands by entering crafted tar parameters in the CLI, aka Bug ID CSCus44856.

CVE-2015-4234
Published: 2015-07-03
Cisco NX-OS 6.0(2) and 6.2(2) on Nexus devices has an improper OS configuration, which allows local users to obtain root access via unspecified input to the Python interpreter, aka Bug IDs CSCun02887, CSCur00115, and CSCur00127.

CVE-2015-4237
Published: 2015-07-03
The CLI parser in Cisco NX-OS 4.1(2)E1(1), 6.2(11b), 6.2(12), 7.2(0)ZZ(99.1), 7.2(0)ZZ(99.3), and 9.1(1)SV1(3.1.8) on Nexus devices allows local users to execute arbitrary OS commands via crafted characters in a filename, aka Bug IDs CSCuv08491, CSCuv08443, CSCuv08480, CSCuv08448, CSCuu99291, CSCuv0...

CVE-2015-4239
Published: 2015-07-03
Cisco Adaptive Security Appliance (ASA) Software 9.3(2.243) and 100.13(0.21) allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (device reload) by sending crafted OSPFv2 packets on the local network, aka Bug ID CSCus84220.

Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Marc Spitler, co-author of the Verizon DBIR will share some of the lesser-known but most intriguing tidbits from the massive report