Vulnerabilities / Threats
9/20/2013
01:36 PM
50%
50%

Android Facebook App Users: Patch Now

Facebook has fixed a bug in its Android app that left photos vulnerable to interception.

9 Android Apps To Improve Security, Privacy
9 Android Apps To Improve Security, Privacy
(click image for larger view)
Facebook apps for Android users: Ensure you've recently updated your Facebook app.

That warning comes via Egyptian security researcher Mohamed Ramadan, who disclosed Thursday that he'd found an HTTPS bug in Facebook's Android app -- as well as Facebook Messenger -- that have now been patched by the social network's security team. The bug could be exploited by an attacker using Wireshark or another sniffing tool to intercept images being transmitted to Facebook.

According to Ramadan's security report to Facebook, filed in February 2013, "I found that the official Facebook Messenger and Facebook app for Android latest version are sending and receiving images using HTTP protocol and anyone on the same wireless network can sniff my traffic and view all images or even replace it with his own images."

As a result, when using a vulnerable version of one of the apps, "if you are using a wireless network at cafe, hotel, airport, museum, disco, your friend's wireless network or even your own wireless network ... an attacker can run cain and abel, Ettercap, SSLstrip or his own tool to poison the traffic and hijack ARP table and sniff your images and your private images and leak it online or send it to his friends," he said.

[ You may have more pressing concerns. See Apple Hacker: Mobile Malware Threat Overrated. ]

Facebook's use of HTTP for sending people's images appeared to be an inadvertent programming error. For comparison's sake, Ramadan noted, Facebook apps for iOS were sending images using HTTPS, which would have prevented anyone from intercepting them using sniffing tools.

Accordingly, he recommended that all affected Android users update immediately, to protect their privacy. "Don't be lazy," said Ramadan, who runs Attack-Secure, which offers "smarter ethical hacking and penetration testing," including a "ninja skills course."

Ramadan's bug disclosure earned him $1,500 as part of Facebook's bug bounty program. Facebook later sweetened the payout by $500 for Ramadan alerting it to HTTPS problems in Facebook Messenger for Android. "Both were rooted in the same code issues so we essentially treated the Messenger issues as part of the same report rewarded with the bounty," Facebook's security team told him.

That didn't mark Ramadan's first appearance on Facebook's White Hat Security wall of thanks. Last year, for example, he earned $3,000 for informing Facebook of a critical vulnerability in its Facebook Camera app for iPhone. He's also spotted vulnerabilities in BlackBerry apps, as well as on the websites of Adobe, GitHub, Google, Microsoft and others.

Attention on how websites transmit people's personal information or potentially sensitive material -- such as photographs -- has been high since security researcher Eric Butler published his Firesheep tool in 2010. The Firefox plug-in allowed anyone to intercept the login information and other sensitive communications to sites such as Amazon, Facebook, Google and Twitter, for anyone connected to the same unsecured wireless network. While such data interception had long been possible using sniffing tools, Butler's plug-in drove most Web services to begin using HTTPS, at least for securing sensitive information such as login credentials.

Learn more about mobile security and other threats by attending the Interop conference track on Risk Management and Security in New York from Sept. 30 to Oct. 4.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: "I've seen worse.  Last week Tim had a dragon."
Current Issue
Security Operations and IT Operations: Finding the Path to Collaboration
A wide gulf has emerged between SOC and NOC teams that's keeping both of them from assuring the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of IT systems. Here's how experts think it should be bridged.
Flash Poll
New Best Practices for Secure App Development
New Best Practices for Secure App Development
The transition from DevOps to SecDevOps is combining with the move toward cloud computing to create new challenges - and new opportunities - for the information security team. Download this report, to learn about the new best practices for secure application development.
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2017-0290
Published: 2017-05-09
NScript in mpengine in Microsoft Malware Protection Engine with Engine Version before 1.1.13704.0, as used in Windows Defender and other products, allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code or cause a denial of service (type confusion and application crash) via crafted JavaScript code within ...

CVE-2016-10369
Published: 2017-05-08
unixsocket.c in lxterminal through 0.3.0 insecurely uses /tmp for a socket file, allowing a local user to cause a denial of service (preventing terminal launch), or possibly have other impact (bypassing terminal access control).

CVE-2016-8202
Published: 2017-05-08
A privilege escalation vulnerability in Brocade Fibre Channel SAN products running Brocade Fabric OS (FOS) releases earlier than v7.4.1d and v8.0.1b could allow an authenticated attacker to elevate the privileges of user accounts accessing the system via command line interface. With affected version...

CVE-2016-8209
Published: 2017-05-08
Improper checks for unusual or exceptional conditions in Brocade NetIron 05.8.00 and later releases up to and including 06.1.00, when the Management Module is continuously scanned on port 22, may allow attackers to cause a denial of service (crash and reload) of the management module.

CVE-2017-0890
Published: 2017-05-08
Nextcloud Server before 11.0.3 is vulnerable to an inadequate escaping leading to a XSS vulnerability in the search module. To be exploitable a user has to write or paste malicious content into the search dialogue.

Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
In past years, security researchers have discovered ways to hack cars, medical devices, automated teller machines, and many other targets. Dark Reading Executive Editor Kelly Jackson Higgins hosts researcher Samy Kamkar and Levi Gundert, vice president of threat intelligence at Recorded Future, to discuss some of 2016's most unusual and creative hacks by white hats, and what these new vulnerabilities might mean for the coming year.