Vulnerabilities / Threats
7/23/2009
03:20 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
LinkedIn
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Adobe Warns Of Critical Flash Vulnerability

Echoing security warnings issued earlier this year, Adobe is warning users of Flash Player, Reader, and Acrobat to exercise caution online due to a zero-day vulnerability that's being actively exploited.

Adobe on Wednesday issued a security advisory about a critical zero-day vulnerability that affects its Flash Player, Reader, and Acrobat software across all major operating systems.

"A critical vulnerability exists in the current versions of Flash Player (v9.0.159.0 and v10.0.22.87) for Windows, Macintosh and Linux operating systems, and the authplay.dll component that ships with Adobe Reader and Acrobat v9.x for Windows, Macintosh and UNIX operating systems," the company said. "This vulnerability (CVE-2009-1862) could cause a crash and potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system."

US-CERT, which operates in conjunction with the Department of Homeland Security, warned users to disable Flash in Adobe Reader 9 on Windows computers and either to disable Flash Player or to enable only known safe Flash content.

Adobe said it will have fixes ready on July 30, for Flash Player, and on July 31 for Reader and Acrobat. In the meantime, it would probably be wise to heed US-CERT's advice: SANS Internet Storm Center handler John Bambenek reports that the vulnerability is being actively exploited.

Only a few malicious sites are currently serving the exploit, he said in a blog post, "but we confirmed that the links have been injected in legitimate Web sites to create a drive-by attack, as expected."

"Flash Player users should exercise caution in browsing untrusted Web sites," Adobe said in its advisory.

A series of recent vulnerabilities affecting Adobe's software -- clickjacking and the JBIG2 vulnerability, to name a few -- have led security experts to question Adobe's approach to security.

In December, Peleus Uhley, senior security researcher on Adobe's secure software Engineering team, published a blog post titled, "We Care," to reassure security researchers that Adobe wants to work with them and to acknowledge "that Adobe needed to do more to reach out to security community and be transparent in our efforts to protect customers."

In May, Brad Arkin, Adobe's director of product security and privacy, outlined three new Adobe security initiatives in a blog post: code hardening, incident response process improvements, and regular security updates.

Also in May, the company released Adobe Reader 9.11 to address at least one critical vulnerability. The following month, it released Reader 9.12 to fix nine critical vulnerabilities.

In a blog post in May, Andrew Storms, nCircle's director of security operations, likened Adobe's initiatives to the approach Microsoft took a decade ago when security issues threatened its reputation. He said that Adobe is off to a great start in rehabilitating its image and that it still had a long way to go.

InformationWeek has published an in-depth report on managing risk. Download the report here (registration required).

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
Partner Perspectives
What's This?
In a digital world inundated with advanced security threats, Intel Security seeks to transform how we live and work to keep our information secure. Through hardware and software development, Intel Security delivers robust solutions that integrate security into every layer of every digital device. In combining the security expertise of McAfee with the innovation, performance, and trust of Intel, this vision becomes a reality.

As we rely on technology to enhance our everyday and business life, we must too consider the security of the intellectual property and confidential data that is housed on these devices. As we increase the number of devices we use, we increase the number of gateways and opportunity for security threats. Intel Security takes the “security connected” approach to ensure that every device is secure, and that all security solutions are seamlessly integrated.
Featured Writers
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Dark Reading's October Tech Digest
Fast data analysis can stymie attacks and strengthen enterprise security. Does your team have the data smarts?
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2014-7298
Published: 2014-10-24
adsetgroups in Centrify Server Suite 2008 through 2014.1 and Centrify DirectControl 3.x through 4.2.0 on Linux and UNIX allows local users to read arbitrary files with root privileges by leveraging improperly protected setuid functionality.

CVE-2014-8346
Published: 2014-10-24
The Remote Controls feature on Samsung mobile devices does not validate the source of lock-code data received over a network, which makes it easier for remote attackers to cause a denial of service (screen locking with an arbitrary code) by triggering unexpected Find My Mobile network traffic.

CVE-2014-0619
Published: 2014-10-23
Untrusted search path vulnerability in Hamster Free ZIP Archiver 2.0.1.7 allows local users to execute arbitrary code and conduct DLL hijacking attacks via a Trojan horse dwmapi.dll that is located in the current working directory.

CVE-2014-2230
Published: 2014-10-23
Open redirect vulnerability in the header function in adclick.php in OpenX 2.8.10 and earlier allows remote attackers to redirect users to arbitrary web sites and conduct phishing attacks via a URL in the (1) dest parameter to adclick.php or (2) _maxdest parameter to ck.php.

CVE-2014-7281
Published: 2014-10-23
Cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerability in Shenzhen Tenda Technology Tenda A32 Router with firmware 5.07.53_CN allows remote attackers to hijack the authentication of administrators for requests that reboot the device via a request to goform/SysToolReboot.

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Follow Dark Reading editors into the field as they talk with noted experts from the security world.