Vulnerabilities / Threats
6/18/2013
12:52 PM
Connect Directly
Twitter
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Slide Show: 10 Ways Attackers Automate Malware Production

Peeking into an attacker's toolbox to see how malware production is automated and the Internet is flooded with millions of unique malware applications
Previous
1 of 10
Next


A full field of malware creation tools has enabled attackers to transition from manually creating single-use and easily defeated malware to developing an automated production line to develop an "army of armored malware" to carry out attack campaigns, says Christopher Elisan, principal malware scientist for RSA NetWitness. Author of Malware, Rootkits & Botnets: A Beginner's Guide and a longtime malware reverser, Elisan recently offered up an extended explanation of how the process works. By using DIY malware kits like Zeus Builder, attackers with very little programming experience can create nearly infinite numbers of malware variants. From there, they can develop both protection from penetration and further variation of samples by running them through armoring tools, such as packers, crypters, and joiners. And once that process is done, they can develop automated quality assurance by running the variants through tools that lean on various AV engines to ensure that the malware remains undetected. It's a process that "basically killed AV," Elisan says and one that depends on tools like the ones outlined here.

Tool: Spy Eye

Tool Type: DIY Kit

How They're Using It: "The main idea of DIY kits is you don't need to have assembly language skills or any programming skills for that matter to create your own malware," says Elisan, who explains that these kits have actually been evolving for the better part of two decades since a 15-year-old created Virus Creation Lab (VCL) in 1992. Spy Eye is one of the first well-used kits of the modern era to use advanced features, such as encryption, and offer it in an easy GUI.

Image Credit: Christopher Elisan/RSA

 

Ericka Chickowski specializes in coverage of information technology and business innovation. She has focused on information security for the better part of a decade and regularly writes about the security industry as a contributor to Dark Reading.  View Full Bio

Previous
1 of 10
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2014-6090
Published: 2015-04-27
Multiple cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerabilities in the (1) DataMappingEditorCommands, (2) DatastoreEditorCommands, and (3) IEGEditorCommands servlets in IBM Curam Social Program Management (SPM) 5.2 SP6 before EP6, 6.0 SP2 before EP26, 6.0.3 before 6.0.3.0 iFix8, 6.0.4 before 6.0.4.5 iFix...

CVE-2014-6092
Published: 2015-04-27
IBM Curam Social Program Management (SPM) 5.2 before SP6 EP6, 6.0 SP2 before EP26, 6.0.4 before 6.0.4.6, and 6.0.5 before 6.0.5.6 requires failed-login handling for web-service accounts to have the same lockout policy as for standard user accounts, which makes it easier for remote attackers to cause...

CVE-2015-0113
Published: 2015-04-27
The Jazz help system in IBM Rational Collaborative Lifecycle Management 4.0 through 5.0.2, Rational Quality Manager 4.0 through 4.0.7 and 5.0 through 5.0.2, Rational Team Concert 4.0 through 4.0.7 and 5.0 through 5.0.2, Rational Requirements Composer 4.0 through 4.0.7, Rational DOORS Next Generation...

CVE-2015-0174
Published: 2015-04-27
The SNMP implementation in IBM WebSphere Application Server (WAS) 8.5 before 8.5.5.5 does not properly handle configuration data, which allows remote authenticated users to obtain sensitive information via unspecified vectors.

CVE-2015-0175
Published: 2015-04-27
IBM WebSphere Application Server (WAS) 8.5 Liberty Profile before 8.5.5.5 does not properly implement authData elements, which allows remote authenticated users to gain privileges via unspecified vectors.

Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Join security and risk expert John Pironti and Dark Reading Editor-in-Chief Tim Wilson for a live online discussion of the sea-changing shift in security strategy and the many ways it is affecting IT and business.