Vulnerabilities / Threats

12/1/2017
10:00 AM
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Security Geek Gift Guide

Fun gifts for cybersecurity co-workers and bosses alike.
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Deck the halls and get to shopping! It's that time of year again, but this time there's no need to scratch your head and desperately wonder what to get the security geeks in your life. We've got you covered with this gift guide, which offers up different ideas based on what kind of security pro you're shopping for. 

So kick back and check out these gift ideas. 

 

Ericka Chickowski specializes in coverage of information technology and business innovation. She has focused on information security for the better part of a decade and regularly writes about the security industry as a contributor to Dark Reading.  View Full Bio

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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
12/18/2017 | 7:14:20 PM
Password Notebook
FWIW, while the password notebook -- clearly labeled and marketed as such -- is utterly ridiculous, many cybersecurity experts have long been reversing the traditional wisdom and advising that people do write their passwords down...just so long as they don't store the written password in an open or obvious place (such as in a top desk drawer, stuck to a computer monitor or keyboard, or in a clearly marked "password notebook").

Of course, the whole purpose of writing down passwords as an enhanced security tactic is that it allows you to have better and more entropic passwords. If you're still going to have passwords like "jordan23" (let alone "password1" or "123456"), you're not doing yourself much good.
Government Shutdown Brings Certificate Lapse Woes
Curtis Franklin Jr., Senior Editor at Dark Reading,  1/11/2019
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Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-3906
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-18
Premisys Identicard version 3.1.190 contains hardcoded credentials in the WCF service on port 9003. An authenticated remote attacker can use these credentials to access the badge system database and modify its contents.
CVE-2019-3907
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-18
Premisys Identicard version 3.1.190 stores user credentials and other sensitive information with a known weak encryption method (MD5 hash of a salt and password).
CVE-2019-3908
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-18
Premisys Identicard version 3.1.190 stores backup files as encrypted zip files. The password to the zip is hard-coded and unchangeable. An attacker with access to these backups can decrypt them and obtain sensitive data.
CVE-2019-3909
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-18
Premisys Identicard version 3.1.190 database uses default credentials. Users are unable to change the credentials without vendor intervention.
CVE-2019-3910
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-18
Crestron AM-100 before firmware version 1.6.0.2 contains an authentication bypass in the web interface's return.cgi script. Unauthenticated remote users can use the bypass to access some administrator functionality such as configuring update sources and rebooting the device.