Vulnerabilities / Threats

8/8/2015
02:00 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Q&A: 20 Minutes With The Dark Tangent

DEF CON founder Jeff Moss on this year's DEF CON 23 hacker conference and the Internet of Things.

DEF CON 23 -- Las Vegas -- Jeff Moss, aka The Dark Tangent, sat down with Dark Reading here yesterday for a quick chat about DEF CON 23 and IoT:

Q: What’s different about DEF CON this year?

Moss: It's just more of everything. Nothing is slowing down [hacking-wise] -- there's just more. We tried to capture more of the content, doing recordings in the Villages. What we're doing is knowledge transfer … of privacy, lock pick [and other Villages] recordings online. It might foster more interest for people to come online and watch.

There's also a certain amount of chaos: welcome to DEF CON.

Q: The Internet of Things now has its own village here at DEF CON, like Lockpick Village and Hardware Hacking Village. What are the challenges with getting security flaws fixed in these products?

Moss: When hackers started picking locks, the lock manufacturers got very upset, saying this is the way we've done it forever, and saw us as interlopers in their space, [saying] 'trust us' [to protect consumers]. But hackers would have none of that and [then] there was the first upgrade to physical locks in decades. We made them get better. In the beginning there were threats of lawsuits and other scariness, but now we know it was a new world.

Then medical devices, now with cars: it's following the same trajectory: 'don't tell anybody' … I'm betting this [car hacking research] will force the whole [car] industry to mature a bit. And it's not going to stop: after cars, it will be something else.

If we don’t get the software updating thing right, there will be trouble.

Q: What can or should the federal government's role be in ensuring IoT products are secured?

Moss: There's not much it can do about it. The government is structurally blocked, bureaucratically, etc. It's inflexible and not adaptable.

Now we're down to regulation, which nobody likes. If your [connected] toaster burns down your house, who are you going to sue? 

Jeff Moss, aka "The Dark Tangent"
Source: DEF CON
Source: DEF CON

Kelly Jackson Higgins is Executive Editor at DarkReading.com. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Veterans Find New Roles in Enterprise Cybersecurity
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  11/12/2018
Empathy: The Next Killer App for Cybersecurity?
Shay Colson, CISSP, Senior Manager, CyberClarity360,  11/13/2018
Understanding Evil Twin AP Attacks and How to Prevent Them
Ryan Orsi, Director of Product Management for Wi-Fi at WatchGuard Technologies,  11/14/2018
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Flash Poll
Online Malware and Threats: A Profile of Today's Security Posture
Online Malware and Threats: A Profile of Today's Security Posture
This report offers insight on how security professionals plan to invest in cybersecurity, and how they are prioritizing their resources. Find out what your peers have planned today!
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2018-18519
PUBLISHED: 2018-11-19
BestXsoftware Best Free Keylogger 5.2.9 allows local users to gain privileges via a Trojan horse "%PROGRAMFILES%\BFK 5.2.9\syscrb.exe" file because of insecure permissions for the BUILTIN\Users group.
CVE-2018-19355
PUBLISHED: 2018-11-19
modules/orderfiles/ajax/upload.php in the Customer Files Upload addon 2018-08-01 for PrestaShop (1.5 through 1.7) allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code by uploading a php file via modules/orderfiles/upload.php with auptype equal to product (for upload destinations under modules/productfi...
CVE-2008-7320
PUBLISHED: 2018-11-18
** DISPUTED ** GNOME Seahorse through 3.30 allows physically proximate attackers to read plaintext passwords by using the quickAllow dialog at an unattended workstation, if the keyring is unlocked. NOTE: this is disputed by a software maintainer because the behavior represents a design decision.
CVE-2018-19358
PUBLISHED: 2018-11-18
GNOME Keyring through 3.28.2 allows local users to retrieve login credentials via a Secret Service API call and the D-Bus interface if the keyring is unlocked, a similar issue to CVE-2008-7320. One perspective is that this occurs because available D-Bus protection mechanisms (involving the busconfig...
CVE-2018-19351
PUBLISHED: 2018-11-18
Jupyter Notebook before 5.7.1 allows XSS via an untrusted notebook because nbconvert responses are considered to have the same origin as the notebook server. In other words, nbconvert endpoints can execute JavaScript with access to the server API. In notebook/nbconvert/handlers.py, NbconvertFileHand...