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4/17/2017
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Kaspersky Lab Extends Bug Bounty Program

Woburn, MA – April 14, 2017 - Kaspersky Lab announced the extension of its bug bounty program, with leading bug bounty platform provider HackerOne, to continue encouraging qualified individuals and organizations to submit reports on vulnerabilities found in the company’s products.

Launched in August 2016, the initial phase of the program helped to successfully uncover roughly 20 bugs in its first six months. As a result, the program is being extended. Initially, researchers were asked to examine Kaspersky Lab’s flagship products for consumers and enterprises, Kaspersky Internet Security 2017 and Kaspersky Endpoint Security 10. Now the company is also adding Kaspersky Password Manager 8, and as an additional incentive for researchers, Kaspersky Lab increased the rewards for remote code execution bugs from $2,000 to $5,000.

With today’s increasingly complex security landscape, bug bounty programs are an effective way for security companies to incentivize external researchers to safely find and disclose software vulnerabilities. In addition to other internal measures, bug bounty programs help companies continuously improve their security tools and provide multiple layers of protection for customers.

“The security of our customers is our priority. That is why we take independent research into our products very seriously and apply its results to constantly improve our best-in-class technologies,” said Nikita Shvetsov, chief technology officer at Kaspersky Lab. “Since August, it is fair to say that our Bug Bounty Program has been successful in optimizing our internal and external mitigation measures to continuously improve the resiliency of our products, which is why we’ve decided to extend it. We also appreciate the enthusiastic participation of security researchers worldwide. As a mark of our respect for the work they do in helping us to bolster our solutions, we’ve increased the remuneration on offer in this second phase of the program and extended the scope to include other important Kaspersky Lab products.”

“Kaspersky Lab is a great example of an organization that prioritizes security at every level,” said Alex Rice, co-founder and CTO at HackerOne. “They recognize the responsibility they have to protect customers — both enterprises and consumers — and are taking every step to ensure vulnerabilities are found and fixed before they can be exploited. The expansion of their program shows their commitment to investing in the global hacker community and ensuring their competitive edge in the security market.”

For more information on the Kaspersky Lab Bug Bounty Program, including eligibility, rewards, exceptions and rules, please visit: https://hackerone.com/kaspersky

About Kaspersky Lab

Kaspersky Lab is a global cybersecurity company founded in 1997. Kaspersky Lab’s deep threat intelligence and security expertise is constantly transforming into security solutions and services to protect businesses, critical infrastructure, governments and consumers around the globe. The company’s comprehensive security portfolio includes leading endpoint protection and a number of specialized security solutions and services to fight sophisticated and evolving digital threats. Over 400 million users are protected by Kaspersky Lab technologies and we help 270,000 corporate clients protect what matters most to them. Learn more at www.kaspersky.com.

About HackerOne
HackerOne is the no.1 hacker-powered security provider, connecting organizations with the world’s largest community of trusted hackers. More than 800 organizations, including The U.S. Department of Defense, General Motors, Intel, Uber, Twitter, GitHub, Nintendo, Kaspersky Lab, Lufthansa, Panasonic Avionics, Qualcomm, Square, Starbucks, Dropbox and the CERT Coordination Center trust HackerOne to find critical software vulnerabilities before criminals can exploit them. HackerOne customers have resolved more than 43,000 vulnerabilities and awarded more than $15M in bug bounties. HackerOne is headquartered in San Francisco with offices in London, Seattle, Los Angeles and the Netherlands. For more information, please visit https://hackerone.com.

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