Vulnerabilities / Threats
7/20/2017
04:00 PM
50%
50%

Healthcare Industry Lacks Awareness of IoT Threat, Survey Says

Three-quarters of IT decision makers report they are "confident" or "very confident" that portable and connected medical devices are secure on their networks.

Healthcare networks are teeming with IoT devices from glucometers to infusion pumps, but a study found that the majority of IT decision makers may be operating with a false sense of security regarding their ability to protect these devices from cyber attacks.

According to a survey of more than 200 healthcare IT decision makers, more than 90% of healthcare IT networks have IoT devices connected to the systems, according to a report released Wednesday by ZingBox.

"Typically you will see 10 to 15 IoT devices per bed in a hospital," says Xu Zou, CEO of ZingBox, defining a healthcare IoT device as anything that is portable and connected to the Internet.

But despite the large presence of these devices, the healthcare industry is largely operating under the assumption that traditional security measures for laptops and servers are fine for securing the medical Internet of Things, the report finds.

For example, 70% of survey participants give their seal of approval for using traditional security technology for medical IoT devices, and 76% say they are "confident" or "very confident" that these portable and connected medical devices are secure on their networks.

The difference in using traditional IT security verses IoT-specific security is that attackers' aim is to gain access to the portable devices, even though the payout of information could be greater if they attacked a server storing a database, Zou says.

"A lot of IoT medical devices are not protected and secure, so they are easier to gain access and control," Zou explains. "The attackers can control them and use them as a botnet."

This type of attitude may explain the recent results in a Ponemon Institute study, which found that while 67% of medical device makers expect an attack on their devices within the next 12 months, only 17% are taking significant steps to prevent it.

Mobile Security IoT's Answer?

Although there are number of similarities between mobile devices and medical "things," the security needs between the two are different, Zou says.

One of the key differences is that security patches and updates can be pushed to a mobile device, but the same is usually not the case for IoT medical devices that cannot receive software pushed to them, says Zou.

"You can push security software onto a laptop or server, but you can't do that with an infusion pump," he notes.

Additionally, medical devices that are used for direct patient care are heavily regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). As a result, a medical device maker may be hesitant to receive third-party software pushed to the device for fear it would nullify or affect the FDA certification it receives for its device, Zou says, noting the certification process can sometimes take five years or so to achieve.

As a result of these regulatory hoops, not one medical device maker uses third-party security software for their IoT devices, he says, adding that, according to Gartner, by 2020, 25% of attacks will be directly on the device.

"CISOs need to find a way to figure out how many IoT devices they have on their network," suggests Zou. "The No. 1 challenge is gaining visibility into this. You cannot protect what you can't see." 

Related Content: 

Black Hat USA returns to the fabulous Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas, Nevada, July 22-27, 2017. Click for information on the conference schedule and to register.

 

 

Dawn Kawamoto is an Associate Editor for Dark Reading, where she covers cybersecurity news and trends. She is an award-winning journalist who has written and edited technology, management, leadership, career, finance, and innovation stories for such publications as CNET's ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
REISEN1955
50%
50%
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/4/2017 | 7:55:46 AM
Re: Confident? - One word answer
Merck.

Yeah, they were probably confident in April of this year - not so much anymore.  
AmmarA720
50%
50%
AmmarA720,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/3/2017 | 2:18:09 PM
decision makers report they are "confident", not any more
"Three-quarters of IT decision makers report they are "confident" or "very confident"

Hearing about all the security issues we deal with it is very hard to say "very confident", all the hits only adding more limitation to the potential design of a product.
PramodV715
100%
0%
PramodV715,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/1/2017 | 11:58:25 PM
You cannot protect what you can't see
Absolutely agree. Today in this world we have 30 billion web pages and more than 1 million mobile apps - Lord knows how secure these are or what kind of harm they cause discreetly.

Especially when it comes to health, it scares me! Big giants like IBM, CISCO may eventually find a way to make them secure but the question is are they reachable to the common man?
matisstar
100%
0%
matisstar,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/26/2017 | 3:16:12 AM
Re: Health Care is Unhealthy IT
the health care profession is in the best position to implement a healthier work environment among its employees, because it is the health professionals who are telling the rest of us how to eat, exercise, decrease stress, and live more balanced lives.
REISEN1955
50%
50%
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/25/2017 | 3:44:49 PM
Health Care is Unhealthy IT
When I had my managed services business in 2014, several of my worst clients were health care - doctors, dentists and they had abysmal appreciation of IT in general, security in particular even though HIPPA ruled their lives.  My best advise was mostly ignored and some hated to pay me as well.  Worst clients of the lot.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2017 | 10:08:19 AM
AI in security
 

"The No. 1 challenge is gaining visibility into this. You cannot protect what you can't see."

I agree with this, that is why we need AI in monitoring of security vulnerabilities I would say.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2017 | 10:05:48 AM
Is it IOT?
 

"One of the key differences is that security patches and updates can be pushed to a mobile device, but the same is usually not the case for IoT medical devices that cannot receive software pushed to them"

If this is the case, should we still consider it IoT?
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2017 | 10:03:29 AM
door bell security
 

"A lot of IoT medical devices are not protected and secure, so they are easier to gain access and control,"

This makes sense, most of IoT devices is designed to get a simple task done, not giving enough attention of security of it. Like let's assume, my door bell is hacked and ringed may times at night. That is all damage it can cause.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2017 | 10:00:09 AM
IoT
 

"Typically you will see 10 to 15 IoT devices per bed in a hospital"

So everything connected is IoT any more, I was always considering those small devices we use. A car is also portable but I do not think anything consider it IoT.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2017 | 9:56:54 AM
Confident?
 

"Three-quarters of IT decision makers report they are "confident" or "very confident""

Confident? This shows a disconnect, once they get hit there will not be any evidence of confidence in their mind.

 
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
Dark Reading Live EVENTS
INsecurity - For the Defenders of Enterprise Security
A Dark Reading Conference
While red team conferences focus primarily on new vulnerabilities and security researchers, INsecurity puts security execution, protection, and operations center stage. The primary speakers will be CISOs and leaders in security defense; the blue team will be the focus.
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: No, no, no! Have a Unix CRON do the pop-up reminders!
Current Issue
Security Vulnerabilities: The Next Wave
Just when you thought it was safe, researchers have unveiled a new round of IT security flaws. Is your enterprise ready?
Flash Poll
The Impact of a Security Breach 2017
The Impact of a Security Breach 2017
Despite the escalation of cybersecurity staffing and technology, enterprises continue to suffer data breaches and compromises at an alarming rate. How do these breaches occur? How are enterprises responding, and what is the impact of these compromises on the business? This report offers new data on the frequency of data breaches, the losses they cause, and the steps that organizations are taking to prevent them in the future.
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2017-0290
Published: 2017-05-09
NScript in mpengine in Microsoft Malware Protection Engine with Engine Version before 1.1.13704.0, as used in Windows Defender and other products, allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code or cause a denial of service (type confusion and application crash) via crafted JavaScript code within ...

CVE-2016-10369
Published: 2017-05-08
unixsocket.c in lxterminal through 0.3.0 insecurely uses /tmp for a socket file, allowing a local user to cause a denial of service (preventing terminal launch), or possibly have other impact (bypassing terminal access control).

CVE-2016-8202
Published: 2017-05-08
A privilege escalation vulnerability in Brocade Fibre Channel SAN products running Brocade Fabric OS (FOS) releases earlier than v7.4.1d and v8.0.1b could allow an authenticated attacker to elevate the privileges of user accounts accessing the system via command line interface. With affected version...

CVE-2016-8209
Published: 2017-05-08
Improper checks for unusual or exceptional conditions in Brocade NetIron 05.8.00 and later releases up to and including 06.1.00, when the Management Module is continuously scanned on port 22, may allow attackers to cause a denial of service (crash and reload) of the management module.

CVE-2017-0890
Published: 2017-05-08
Nextcloud Server before 11.0.3 is vulnerable to an inadequate escaping leading to a XSS vulnerability in the search module. To be exploitable a user has to write or paste malicious content into the search dialogue.