Vulnerabilities / Threats
5/29/2013
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Tim Wilson
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Getting A Jump On Black Hat USA

Dark Reading initiates early coverage on July Black Hat USA event, launches dedicated news page

It's the beginning of the summer. While we begin our season of beach trips and backyard barbecues, most of us in the security industry are also beginning to think about the annual Black Hat USA conference, which takes place from July 27-Aug. 1 this year at Caesar's Palace in Las Vegas.

Click here for more of Dark Reading's Black Hat articles.

Black Hat, if you've never been to one, is an annual meeting/asylum for security researchers and professionals who are interested in cutting-edge developments in methods of cyberattack and defense. Typically, numerous new vulnerabilities and proofs of concept are unveiled, and the ripples that begin with presentations in those hotel conference rooms are often felt throughout the rest of the year.

At Dark Reading, we've always made it a priority to post the news on these new vulnerabilities as soon as humanly possible, so we begin calling the speakers as soon as the abstracts of their talks are published. Already this month, we've published two news stories on Black Hat sessions, as well as a number of announcements from the Black Hat conference team.

To make it easier to find all of our Black Hat news, we have launched our annual Black Hat news page, which is created and managed by Dark Reading managing editor Gayle Kesten. Although the show itself is still two months away, you'll find a number of stories already posted there.

The idea behind the news page is to give you a single place to find all of the developments coming out of the show, including product and speaker announcements as well as new research that will be published at the conference. Whether or not you're planning to attend the event, this page will give you a chance to catch up on the latest, both in terms of new vulnerabilities and on the conference itself.

In addition to the news page, Dark Reading will be posting a variety of special Black Hat coverage during the next two months, culminating in a daily newsletter that will be delivered by email to all attendees as well as those who are regular subscribers to the Dark Reading newsletters.

We hope you will use our Black Hat news page to keep track of the latest developments coming out of the conference, and to prepare for the event itself. As always, if you have any suggestions for the page or for our Black Hat coverage, please send us an email. Tim Wilson is Editor in Chief and co-founder of Dark Reading.com, UBM Tech's online community for information security professionals. He is responsible for managing the site, assigning and editing content, and writing breaking news stories. Wilson has been recognized as one ... View Full Bio

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