Vulnerabilities / Threats

11/15/2016
03:45 PM
Sara Peters
Sara Peters
Commentary
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail vvv
50%
50%

Dark Reading Radio: 'Bug Bounties & The Zero-Day Trade'

Join us, HackerOne's Alex Rice, and Veracode's Chris Wysopal for the next episode of Dark Reading Radio, today, Wednesday Nov. 16, at 1pmET.

Auto manufacturers, Apple (finally), and even the US military have recently launched bug bounty programs -- inviting security researchers to locate vulnerabilities in their products or systems, and paying sometimes tens of thousands of dollars for just one bug. So bug bounties must be a great idea, right?

Surely these programs have improved cybersecurity, but are there drawbacks as well? Are there negative impacts on security? And how much does a good corporate bug bounty program cost?  

Join us to discuss all this and more on the next episode of Dark Reading radio, "Bug Bounties and the Zero-Day Trade," Wednesday, Nov. 16, at 1 p.m. Eastern Time. We'll pick the brains of expert guests HackerOne CTO and co-founder Alex Rice and Veracode CTO and co-founder Chris Wysopal.

Some of the other questions we'll ask: 

  • Is the promise of money driving the kinds of bugs we look for? Does that skew our understanding of what applications really are the most vulnerable? Does it cause us to miss out on finding more significant vulnerabilities?
  • Is “responsible disclosure” – or “collaborative disclosure” – getting the job done? Are there any industries or cases in which it’s routinely failing us?
  • There is also a “gray market” for zero-day vulnerabilities, sold to law enforcement or government intelligence agencies instead of reported to the vulnerable party. Who supplies the 0-days to that market? Can a corporation's bug-bounty budget compete with the cash quietly exchanged in those gray marketplaces? 
  • An organization obviously wants a vulnerability researcher to report a bug in their product to them first, not to an attacker, a short-seller, or the media. A bug bounty program is a way to encourage researchers to bring bugs directly to you ... but how big do these bounties need to be? How do make sure you’ve got a successful bounty program that doesn’t break the bank? 

Join me, Alex Rice, and Chris Wysopal at 1 p.m. ET, Wednesday, Nov. 16 - to discuss all this and more on Dark Reading Radio.

Have questions of your own? Don't hold back: head on over and add them to the chat, which is already open, and we may answer them on air. Or, join us live and chat with the speakers directly. Can't make it to the live event? Fear not: a recording of the show will be available just moments after it ends. Register now.

Related Content:

 

Sara Peters is Senior Editor at Dark Reading and formerly the editor-in-chief of Enterprise Efficiency. Prior that she was senior editor for the Computer Security Institute, writing and speaking about virtualization, identity management, cybersecurity law, and a myriad ... View Full Bio
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
WebAuthn, FIDO2 Infuse Browsers, Platforms with Strong Authentication
John Fontana, Standards & Identity Analyst, Yubico,  9/19/2018
NSS Labs Files Antitrust Suit Against Symantec, CrowdStrike, ESET, AMTSO
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  9/19/2018
Turn the NIST Cybersecurity Framework into Reality: 5 Steps
Mukul Kumar & Anupam Sahai, CISO & VP of Cyber Practice and VP Product Management, Cavirin Systems,  9/20/2018
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: Are you sure this is how we get our data into the cloud?
Current Issue
Flash Poll
The Risk Management Struggle
The Risk Management Struggle
The majority of organizations are struggling to implement a risk-based approach to security even though risk reduction has become the primary metric for measuring the effectiveness of enterprise security strategies. Read the report and get more details today!
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2015-8298
PUBLISHED: 2018-09-24
Multiple SQL injection vulnerabilities in the login page in RXTEC RXAdmin UPDATE 06 / 2012 allow remote attackers to execute arbitrary SQL commands via the (1) loginpassword, (2) loginusername, (3) zusatzlicher, or (4) groupid parameter to index.htm, or the (5) rxtec cookie to index.htm.
CVE-2018-14825
PUBLISHED: 2018-09-24
A skilled attacker with advanced knowledge of the target system could exploit this vulnerability by creating an application that would successfully bind to the service and gain elevated system privileges. This could enable the attacker to obtain access to keystrokes, passwords, personal identifiable...
CVE-2018-17437
PUBLISHED: 2018-09-24
Memory leak in the H5O_dtype_decode_helper() function in H5Odtype.c in the HDF HDF5 through 1.10.3 library allows attackers to cause a denial of service (memory consumption) via a crafted HDF5 file.
CVE-2018-17438
PUBLISHED: 2018-09-24
A SIGFPE signal is raised in the function H5D__select_io() of H5Dselect.c in the HDF HDF5 through 1.10.3 library during an attempted parse of a crafted HDF file, because of incorrect protection against division by zero. It could allow a remote denial of service attack.
CVE-2018-17439
PUBLISHED: 2018-09-24
An issue was discovered in the HDF HDF5 1.10.3 library. There is a stack-based buffer overflow in the function H5S_extent_get_dims() in H5S.c. Specifically, this issue occurs while converting an HDF5 file to a GIF file.