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3/7/2014
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Black Hat Asia 2014: The Weaponized Web

These Black Hat Briefings explore ways the Web can be weaponized -- and how to defend against them

The World Wide Web has grown exponentially since its birth 21 years ago, and it now serves as the interface for many of the apps we use every day. It's hard to imagine a more enticing target for hacks and exploits. Today's trio of Black Hat Briefings explore ways the Web can be weaponized ... and how to defend against it.

Even as HTML 5 proliferates as an enabler of rich interactive Web applications, cross-site scripting (XSS) remains one of the top three Web application vulnerabilities. DOM-based XSS is growing in popularity, but its client-side nature makes it difficult to monitor for malicious payloads. Ultimate Dom Based XSS Detection Scanner on Clouddelves into this thorny issue. Nera W. C. Liu and Albert Yu will show how they managed to introduce and propagate tainted attributes to a DOM input interface, and then devised a system to detect such breaches by harnessing the power of PhantomJS, a headless browser for automation.

JavaScript's ubiquity makes it the subject of aggressive security-community research, boosting its effective security level every day. Sounds good, but in JS Suicide: Using JavaScript Security Features to Kill JS Security, AhamedNafeez will demonstrate that these security features can be a double-edged sword, sometimes allowing an attacker to disable certain other JS protection mechanisms. In particular, the sandboxing features of ECMAScript 5 can break security in many JS applications. Real-world examples of other JS security lapses are also on the agenda.

Ready-made exploit kits make it easier than ever for malicious parties to victimize unwary Internet users. Jose Miguel Esparza will take us down that rabbit hole in PDF Attack: A Journey From the Exploit Kit to the Shellcode, in which he'll teach how to manually extract obfuscated URLs and binaries from these weaponized pages. You'll also learn how to do modify a malicious PDF payload yourself to bypass AV software, a useful trick for pentesting.

Looking to register? Please visit Black Hat Asia 2014's registration page to get started.

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CVE-2012-5485
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registerConfiglet.py in Plone before 4.2.3 and 4.3 before beta 1 allows remote attackers to execute Python code via unspecified vectors, related to the admin interface.

CVE-2012-5486
Published: 2014-09-30
ZPublisher.HTTPRequest._scrubHeader in Zope 2 before 2.13.19, as used in Plone before 4.3 beta 1, allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary HTTP headers via a linefeed (LF) character.

CVE-2012-5487
Published: 2014-09-30
The sandbox whitelisting function (allowmodule.py) in Plone before 4.2.3 and 4.3 before beta 1 allows remote authenticated users with certain privileges to bypass the Python sandbox restriction and execute arbitrary Python code via vectors related to importing.

CVE-2012-5488
Published: 2014-09-30
python_scripts.py in Plone before 4.2.3 and 4.3 before beta 1 allows remote attackers to execute Python code via a crafted URL, related to createObject.

CVE-2012-5489
Published: 2014-09-30
The App.Undo.UndoSupport.get_request_var_or_attr function in Zope before 2.12.21 and 3.13.x before 2.13.11, as used in Plone before 4.2.3 and 4.3 before beta 1, allows remote authenticated users to gain access to restricted attributes via unspecified vectors.

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