Vulnerabilities / Threats

11/5/2018
02:10 PM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
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7 Non-Computer Hacks That Should Never Happen

From paper to IoT, security researchers offer tips for protecting common attack surfaces that you're probably overlooking.
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 Pixabay

Pixabay

You might look at an old fax machine or dusty printer and just see out-of-date technology that you can't even use to send email. You might look at the company mailroom as just a place to collect unsolicited junk mail you'll soon throw in the trash. Attackers may see something different: vulnerabilities, often ignored by your security department. Cyberrattacks on non-computer vectors are more common than you think. 

For example, Check Point Software Technologies research on all-in-one machines this August found vulnerabilities in the popular HP Officejet Pro All-in-One fax printers. According to the Check Point research, the same protocols are also used by many other vendors’ faxes and multi-function printers, and in popular online fax services such as fax2email, so it’s highly possible that these are also vulnerable to attack by the same method. While not the most modern technology, 62 percent of respondents to a Spiceworks survey in 2017 said that they are still supporting physical fax machines, and 82 percent of respondents to an IDC survey reported that their use of faxing actually increased in 2017. Faxes especially are still widely used in the healthcare, legal, banking, and real estate sectors, where organizations store and process vast amounts of highly sensitive personal data. 

That's just one example of the often overlooked attack vectors on systems and environments not used for traditional computing. Read on for more.

In developing this feature, we talked to security researchers at InGuardians and IOActive, two companies that specialize in penetration testing, to help businesses uncover network vulnerabilities. We talked with Tyler Robinson, senior managing security analyst and head of offensive services at InGuardians; and John H. Sawyer, director of red team services at IOActive.

 

Steve Zurier has more than 30 years of journalism and publishing experience, most of the last 24 of which were spent covering networking and security technology. Steve is based in Columbia, Md. View Full Bio

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Big Ralfie
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Big Ralfie,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/1/2018 | 2:36:24 PM
Piss-Poor Printouts
Worse yet, when I try to print the article, no matter which page I try to print, all I get is page one. Why are your web designers so lazy?
wperry31
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wperry31,
User Rank: Strategist
12/1/2018 | 10:45:11 AM
How about giving us the opportunity to print out the entire article/
When we go through the selection process to view a report - it would be helpful if we could print out the ENTIIRE article rather than one page at a time.  That's a pain.

 

Thanks,

 

 

Bill
jswalsh2000
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jswalsh2000,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/12/2018 | 5:24:04 PM
Target breach via HVAC devices?
The information I've read about the Target breach was a Target provided vendor web portal was breached. 

The HVAC service provider's staff had been victims of a phishing attack which allowed for the credentials to be stolen. From there the attackers accessed Target's web portal and hacked into the webserver from there they elevated privileges and started to map Target's north American network which include eftpos endpoints where credit/debit card information was collected. The only reference to HVAC was it happened to be an HVAC company engaged to service HVAC systems for stores in a region.

If the assessment of this breach has changed or been updated, can you please provide urls which descibe Target's HVAC device compromise so I can update my understanding of the breach.

Thanks
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