Threat Intelligence
4/6/2017
10:30 AM
Paul Kurtz
Paul Kurtz
Commentary
Connect Directly
LinkedIn
RSS
E-Mail vvv
50%
50%

Commodity Ransomware Is Here

When deploying ransomware is as easy as ordering a pizza, the best defense is through better threat intelligence sharing.

With "Philadelphia," a slick ransomware-as-a-service interface that enables almost anyone to launch a sophisticated ransomware campaign, suddenly, deploying ransomware is easy as ordering a pizza. The criminal developers behind Philadelphia even had the heart to offer a “mercy” feature should a victim plead for access to ransomed family photos of lost family and friends.

Welcome to the new world of commodity malware!

As the co-founder of a threat intelligence exchange platform, I see of lot of trending campaigns before they reach mainstream, and Philadelphia typifies many of the new age indicators we’re starting to see in incident data from companies across the cloud, finance, and healthcare sectors.

Below are some key insights about this new era of commodity malware so that you can spot patterns within your own data.

Insight #1 - The Exploit Kit Playbook: Many incident reports show multiple ransomware campaigns relying on an easy-to-buy RIG exploit kit, and then combining it with commoditized ransomware like Cerber and Locky. The playbook for creating new ransomware campaigns has been written and everyone is following it.

Insight #2 - Block and Tackle: Blocking a specific exploit kit or ransomware software will lead to short-term disruption of some campaigns but bad actors will find a different exploit kit or ransomware to weaponize and evolve into a new campaign.

For example, from January to June of 2016, Angler was the predominant exploit kit being seen in reports submitted to the wider security community until it was disrupted due to arrests of a criminal hacking gang in Russia. When the Angler exploit kit went down, cybercriminals began searching for a new go-to exploit kit, and in early September 2016 the RIG exploit kit became the predominant cybercriminals exploit kit. 

Image Source: Paul Kurtz 
Visualization shows the connection between infrastructure and payload IoCs initially used with the Angler exploit kit, now being delivered by RIG EK.
Image Source: Paul Kurtz
Visualization shows the connection between infrastructure and payload IoCs initially used with the Angler exploit kit, now being delivered by RIG EK.

Insight #3 - Low-Effort, High-Efficacy: Malware usually requires additional steps to monetize a successful exploit. Whether it is pulling exfiltrated data from the first level C2 or stolen passwords, the bad guys have to do the work of posting that information for sale after packaging the data in a specific size and/or format. On the other hand, ransomware is fire and forget. As soon as it hits a system the payoff is instantaneous.

In previous malware models there was usually a way for the user to remove or mitigate the issue. If the user gets a keylogger, RAT, or rootkit on their system there is almost always a way to remove the offending malware. Sometimes the steps to remove the malware can be tedious, or special tools are needed, but there is a path to a solution. This is not the case with ransomware. Pretty much all ransomware utilizes asynchronous encryption, making reversal extremely difficult.

It’s Not Just You
Ransomware campaigns bar access to critical data but they can also be used to disrupt system operations. Recall the Hollywood Presbyterian ransomware attack just over a year ago. The attack disrupted emergency room operations and patients had to be diverted to other hospitals.

The trend of commoditized ransomware raises an even larger issue within the security community: companies need to stop assuming they are being singled out for attacks. The truth is, you’re not that special. In fact, according to our latest platform analysis, 65% of our threat reports are correlating across companies regardless of sector.

There is absolutely no reason that after one victim has been hit by a particular ransomware attack others must fall victim to the same attack. What we’re seeing in the media and from our own platform data insights underscore the fact that commoditized ransomware campaigns will become increasingly opportunistic, and will not be as targeted.

As hacks continue to be replicated with more ease, the private sector must not fight alone. Exchanging threat intelligence to identify trending campaigns and provide context to mitigate against these campaigns is the only path forward.

Related Content:

 

Paul Kurtz is the CEO and cofounder of TruSTAR Technology. Prior to TruSTAR, Paul was the CISO and chief strategy officer for CyberPoint International LLC where he built the US government and international business verticals. Prior to CyberPoint, Paul was the managing partner ... View Full Bio
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
Dark Reading Live EVENTS
INsecurity - For the Defenders of Enterprise Security
A Dark Reading Conference
While red team conferences focus primarily on new vulnerabilities and security researchers, INsecurity puts security execution, protection, and operations center stage. The primary speakers will be CISOs and leaders in security defense; the blue team will be the focus.
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: No, no, no! Have a Unix CRON do the pop-up reminders!
Current Issue
Security Vulnerabilities: The Next Wave
Just when you thought it was safe, researchers have unveiled a new round of IT security flaws. Is your enterprise ready?
Flash Poll
The Impact of a Security Breach 2017
The Impact of a Security Breach 2017
Despite the escalation of cybersecurity staffing and technology, enterprises continue to suffer data breaches and compromises at an alarming rate. How do these breaches occur? How are enterprises responding, and what is the impact of these compromises on the business? This report offers new data on the frequency of data breaches, the losses they cause, and the steps that organizations are taking to prevent them in the future.
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2017-0290
Published: 2017-05-09
NScript in mpengine in Microsoft Malware Protection Engine with Engine Version before 1.1.13704.0, as used in Windows Defender and other products, allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code or cause a denial of service (type confusion and application crash) via crafted JavaScript code within ...

CVE-2016-10369
Published: 2017-05-08
unixsocket.c in lxterminal through 0.3.0 insecurely uses /tmp for a socket file, allowing a local user to cause a denial of service (preventing terminal launch), or possibly have other impact (bypassing terminal access control).

CVE-2016-8202
Published: 2017-05-08
A privilege escalation vulnerability in Brocade Fibre Channel SAN products running Brocade Fabric OS (FOS) releases earlier than v7.4.1d and v8.0.1b could allow an authenticated attacker to elevate the privileges of user accounts accessing the system via command line interface. With affected version...

CVE-2016-8209
Published: 2017-05-08
Improper checks for unusual or exceptional conditions in Brocade NetIron 05.8.00 and later releases up to and including 06.1.00, when the Management Module is continuously scanned on port 22, may allow attackers to cause a denial of service (crash and reload) of the management module.

CVE-2017-0890
Published: 2017-05-08
Nextcloud Server before 11.0.3 is vulnerable to an inadequate escaping leading to a XSS vulnerability in the search module. To be exploitable a user has to write or paste malicious content into the search dialogue.