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8/15/2018
04:10 PM
Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
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2018 Pwnie Awards: Who Pwned, Who Got Pwned

A team of security experts round up the best and worst of the year in cybersecurity at Black Hat 2018.
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(Image: Black Hat via Flickr)

(Image: Black Hat via Flickr)

The Pwnie awards, which take place at the annual Black Hat conference in Las Vegas each summer, acknowledge the achievements and failures of cybersecurity researchers and the infosec community as a whole.

Security pros started submitting nominations in June 2018 for bugs disclosed over the past year. Nominees were posted in August and winners were determined by a panel of security researchers, or "the closest to a jury of peers a hacker is likely to ever get," its website quips.

Pwnie categories range from "Best Privilege Escalation Bug" to "Most Overhyped Bug" to "Lamest Vendor Response." A Lifetime Achievement award recognizes a member of the security community who stands out for research and contributions to the industry.

This year's informal awards ceremony, hosted by a panel of respected (and hilarious) security experts, was packed with attendees and laughs as they presented Pwnies for the best and worst in security. Some lucky award recipients were in the audience; others (John McAfee, for example) weren't.

"We believe this is the best antidote to any creeping cynicism we have in our community," joked Justine Bone, CEO of MedSec and one of the Pwnie panelists.

Read on to learn more about who won, who lost, and who pwned at this year's show.

Learn from the industry's most knowledgeable CISOs and IT security experts in a setting that is conducive to interaction and conversation. Early bird rate ends August 31. Click for more info

 

Kelly Sheridan is the Staff Editor at Dark Reading, where she focuses on cybersecurity news and analysis. She is a business technology journalist who previously reported for InformationWeek, where she covered Microsoft, and Insurance & Technology, where she covered financial ... View Full Bio

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