Analytics
5/13/2008
09:00 AM
Connect Directly
Google+
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Third Wave of Web Attacks Not the Last

The latest round of SQL injection Website attacks is stealthier - and from multiple regions

Researchers say the latest wave of Web hacks is related but more sophisticated -- and may have spawned copycat attacks.

David Dewey, manager of IBM ISS X-Force Research, says the latest round of SQL injection attacks on legitimate Websites are using commands that aren’t typical SQL commands. “These are commands that are intended to hide from network monitoring devices” such as IPSes and Web application firewalls, Dewey says. “The changes we're seeing are in their obfuscation techniques."

X-Force has seen anywhere from 20 to 30 new malicious sites popping up each day to host the malicious content that the attacks use, he says. The attacks for the most part have been out of China, Dewey says, but there’s been a growing trend of the attacks coming out of Europe as well.

He and his team believe the attack was initially organized by a single group, likely in China. “Then it caught on, and there were more waves,” some of which were possibly copycat attacks as well as other groups joining in, he says.

X-Force first noticed someone experimenting with this very type of attack that’s now underway back in January. So far, the infected Websites have been random victims, Dewey says. “As far as we can tell, the targets seem to be arbitrary. They blast it out and whoever accepts this SQL injection ends up being attacked.”

And although the attackers are using SQL injection to infect the Website applications, SQL injection is really just a means to setting up a persistent cross-site scripting (XSS) attack, Dewey says. “When you get down to the nuts and bolts of it, this is a cross-site scripting attack. SQL injection was just a vehicle to get there,” he says. “That’s because this is a more likely source of a persistent XSS than if the vehicle was XSS itself,” which would require a more targeted attack rather than the blanket one we’re seeing, he says.

And expect yet another wave of SQL injection attacks, he says. “There will be a fourth, a fifth, and a sixth."

“Frankly, SQL injection [vulnerabilities] have been so prolific for so long I’m surprised it took so long for it to be” exploited this way, Dewey says.

— Kelly Jackson Higgins, Senior Editor, Dark Reading

  • IBM Internet Security Systems

    Kelly Jackson Higgins is Executive Editor at DarkReading.com. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

    Comment  | 
    Print  | 
    More Insights
  • Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
    Partner Perspectives
    What's This?
    In a digital world inundated with advanced security threats, Intel Security seeks to transform how we live and work to keep our information secure. Through hardware and software development, Intel Security delivers robust solutions that integrate security into every layer of every digital device. In combining the security expertise of McAfee with the innovation, performance, and trust of Intel, this vision becomes a reality.

    As we rely on technology to enhance our everyday and business life, we must too consider the security of the intellectual property and confidential data that is housed on these devices. As we increase the number of devices we use, we increase the number of gateways and opportunity for security threats. Intel Security takes the “security connected” approach to ensure that every device is secure, and that all security solutions are seamlessly integrated.
    Featured Writers
    White Papers
    Cartoon
    Current Issue
    Dark Reading's October Tech Digest
    Fast data analysis can stymie attacks and strengthen enterprise security. Does your team have the data smarts?
    Flash Poll
    Threat Intel Today
    Threat Intel Today
    The 397 respondents to our new survey buy into using intel to stay ahead of attackers: 85% say threat intelligence plays some role in their IT security strategies, and many of them subscribe to two or more third-party feeds; 10% leverage five or more.
    Video
    Slideshows
    Twitter Feed
    Dark Reading - Bug Report
    Bug Report
    Enterprise Vulnerabilities
    From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
    CVE-2014-7298
    Published: 2014-10-24
    adsetgroups in Centrify Server Suite 2008 through 2014.1 and Centrify DirectControl 3.x through 4.2.0 on Linux and UNIX allows local users to read arbitrary files with root privileges by leveraging improperly protected setuid functionality.

    CVE-2014-8346
    Published: 2014-10-24
    The Remote Controls feature on Samsung mobile devices does not validate the source of lock-code data received over a network, which makes it easier for remote attackers to cause a denial of service (screen locking with an arbitrary code) by triggering unexpected Find My Mobile network traffic.

    CVE-2014-0619
    Published: 2014-10-23
    Untrusted search path vulnerability in Hamster Free ZIP Archiver 2.0.1.7 allows local users to execute arbitrary code and conduct DLL hijacking attacks via a Trojan horse dwmapi.dll that is located in the current working directory.

    CVE-2014-2230
    Published: 2014-10-23
    Open redirect vulnerability in the header function in adclick.php in OpenX 2.8.10 and earlier allows remote attackers to redirect users to arbitrary web sites and conduct phishing attacks via a URL in the (1) dest parameter to adclick.php or (2) _maxdest parameter to ck.php.

    CVE-2014-7281
    Published: 2014-10-23
    Cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerability in Shenzhen Tenda Technology Tenda A32 Router with firmware 5.07.53_CN allows remote attackers to hijack the authentication of administrators for requests that reboot the device via a request to goform/SysToolReboot.

    Best of the Web
    Dark Reading Radio
    Archived Dark Reading Radio
    Follow Dark Reading editors into the field as they talk with noted experts from the security world.