Black Hat USA
August 2-7, 2014
Mandalay Bay, Las Vegas, NV
Black Hat Europe
October 14-17, 2014
Amsterdam Rai, The Netherlands
8/13/2012
02:53 PM
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Slide Show: Memorable Moments From Black Hat 2012

A look at some of the demos, hacks, awards, and parties at this year's Black Hat USA 2012 convention
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During a Black Hat press conference, IOActive's Iftach Ian Amit spoke about steps companies can take tobetter defend their networks. Amit advocatedvwhat he dubbed Sexydefense for his talk at the show -- he art of being more proactive about defending networks.

"Counterintel is fair game," he said. "Everything around is yours; you better know everything that goes on out there."

Photo Credit: Rob Lemos

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