Attacks/Breaches
3/11/2014
08:06 AM
Bob Covello
Bob Covello
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IT Generations: Communicating Across The Great Divide

At 25 years old, the World Wide Web today presents unique challenges for millennials and crusty curmudgeons alike. Here's how geeks of any age can learn to talk to each other.

Source: Photobucket
Source: Photobucket

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Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
3/14/2014 | 10:49:55 AM
Re: Remarkable coincidence!
Thanks for sharing the NYTimes piece, Bob. There's a great quote in it from David Dalrymple, a technologist in the valley:

 "The most innovative and effective companies are old-guard companies that have managed to reach out to the new guard, like Apple, or vice versa, like Google."

Can anyone share their experiences across the gnerations that worked together to innovate and create great products?
Bob Covello
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Bob Covello,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/13/2014 | 9:19:18 AM
Remarkable coincidence!
Holy synchronicity, Batman!

A similar article to what I wrote is going to run in this Sunday's New York Times.

Now I know how the Beatles felt when The Rolling Stones showed up.

Now I know how Facebook felt when Twitter arrived!

Sadly, the author's outlook is not as positive as mine.

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/16/magazine/silicon-valleys-youth-problem.html?ref=magazine&_r=0
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/12/2014 | 7:51:44 AM
Command line
The command line is as important as it ever was, just look at new tools like PowerShell. You cannot administer systems using a free app on your smartphone. Sadly, a lot of things are still incredibly complicated and bare bones. Just look at any code that needs to tell a system in tiny steps what to do. The only way to overcome this is through frameworks that make life a bit easier.
Bob Covello
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Bob Covello,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/11/2014 | 3:40:32 PM
Re: Back when...
Back in my Early years, I drove a truck for Airborne Express, so you are correct!

We got that data to its destination before 10:30 AM Next Business Day.
Somedude8
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Somedude8,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/11/2014 | 3:26:45 PM
Back when...
Back in my day, we had to carve nested tables in to stone tablets and FedEx them to the server.

Nothing tops the bitrate of a FedEx truck packed full of drives!
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Ninja
3/11/2014 | 2:54:45 PM
Sure we repeat
I'm not so certain that we don't repeat history - just in a different jacket. How different is a private cloud from a mainframe in theory (slicing a large volume of capacity into discrete services). Or DevOps. It seems like there was a time when developers weren't silo'd like they are now.
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