Analytics // Security Monitoring

NSA Surveillance Fallout Costs IT Industry Billions

Analysts predict US tech companies may lose $180 billion by 2016 due to international concerns about intelligence agencies' spying.

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tsreyb
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tsreyb,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/17/2013 | 6:32:39 AM
Gross impact or net impact
The lost revenue is recouped partially, if not completely, by the fact that tech firms need to develop (& sell) the features for enabling surveilance. The customers include not only the NSA but also other govenmental agencies from all over the globe. 
jgherbert
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jgherbert,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/30/2013 | 9:12:18 PM
Re: Blackberry Technology
@DanS776: the approved list for DoD appears to go way beyond BB -- https://aplits.disa.mil/processAPList.do?group=Multi%20Function%20Mobile.

 

Pentagon too: http://www.infoworld.com/d/mobile-technology/pentagon-approves-samsung-knox-blackberry-10-ios-approval-imminent-217877

 

And many branches of government have been using NSA-Approved GD Sectera phones for ages (one of which is now the Samsung Knox) - http://www.gdc4s.com/gd-protected?taxonomyCat=504

 

So nothing against BB - they are still the majority phone in use, but they're not the only approved solution.
samicksha
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samicksha,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/29/2013 | 4:21:00 AM
Re: Blackberry Technology
Even i am suprised @Dan, how are you so sure about BB security. Although i cannot deny the fact that BB keeps strong security measures. Other than this...

Polls conducted in June 2013 found divided results among Americans regarding NSA's secret data collection.Rasmussen Reports found that 59% of Americans disapprove, Gallup found that 53% disapprove,and Pew found that 56% are in favor of NSA data collection. Source: Wikipedia.
GeorgeH239
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GeorgeH239,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/28/2013 | 2:04:43 PM
Isn't this just fine

 

As industry in the U.S. was being snuffed out by our own govt (court decisions favoring unions' overpricing labor, EPA regulations, etc., etc.), the story then became that we would become an information economy: we would supply software and information systems innovation, etc. to the world.

 

 

Now, the "information economy" is out the window, thanks again to our govt and their incessant insistence on snooping into every aspect of everyone's lives.

 

 

RichardV928
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RichardV928,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/27/2013 | 11:10:10 PM
Re: Splinternet
We don't get along.

The Chinese have their own space station and are landing on the moon next month and may pollute it in the process.

We don't get along at all.
DanS776
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DanS776,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/27/2013 | 8:29:36 PM
Blackberry Security
RIM's Blackberry technology and Playbook devices still are the only mobile devices with "authority to operate" on Department of Defense networks.
DanS776
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50%
DanS776,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/27/2013 | 8:23:30 PM
Re: Blackberry Technology
The U.S. military, the Pentagon, and the NSA use Blackberry telephones. Why? Because they are secure.
Tom Murphy
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Tom Murphy,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/27/2013 | 5:41:14 PM
Re: Blackberry Technology
J Brandt/Dan:   Blackberry IS known for its heightened security, but no security is "bullet proof."
Tom Murphy
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Tom Murphy,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/27/2013 | 5:39:47 PM
Re: Reality Checks
anon:  Who are you arguing with? Who argued that the US should do it? Who argued that technology is to blame?  It seems you're shadow-boxing, my friend.
J_Brandt
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J_Brandt,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/27/2013 | 5:33:02 PM
Re: Blackberry Technology
@Dan, what makes you think Blackberry is so bullet proof?
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