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1/14/2014
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Tim Wilson
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FTC Warns Users Of New Twist On Tech Support Scam

Scammers now offering "refunds" on bogus tech support services, stealing customer data, FTC says

You've heard about scammers who call unsuspecting consumers and offer to "fix" computer problems that aren't there -- and steal their money and personal information in the process.

Now there's a new twist: Scammers are now calling the victims of these attacks and offering a "refund" on the bogus services, only to steal more data and account information.

According to a recently issued warning by the Federal Trade Commission, scammers are now double-dipping on the victims of their fake IT services, calling again to offer bogus refunds to customers who weren't satisfied.

"Once they’ve got you hooked, they claim that they need your bank or credit card account number to process the refund," the FTC says. "They might say that you need to create a Western Union account to receive the money. They may even offer to help you fill out the necessary forms -- if you give them remote access to your computer. But instead of transferring money to your account, the scammer withdraws money from your account."

The FTC advises consumers who have been victims of false IT services to hang up on subsequent callers and file a complaint at ftc.gov/complaint.

Have a comment on this story? Please click "Add a Comment" below. If you'd like to contact Dark Reading's editors directly, send us a message.

Tim Wilson is Editor in Chief and co-founder of Dark Reading.com, UBM Tech's online community for information security professionals. He is responsible for managing the site, assigning and editing content, and writing breaking news stories. Wilson has been recognized as one ... View Full Bio

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