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5/14/2012
09:27 AM
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Dark Reading Launches New Tech Center On Threat Intelligence

Subsite of Dark Reading will look at collection and analysis of data on emerging threats

Today Dark Reading launches a new feature: the Threat Intelligence Tech Center, a subsite of Dark Reading devoted to bringing you more detailed news, insight, and in-depth reporting on the process of collecting and analyzing data on emerging threats.

This is the 12th of our Dark Reading Tech Centers, which are designed to provide you with a more focused view of specific issues, threats, and technologies in the world of IT security. The Tech Centers offer in-depth reports and studies, breaking news, and links to additional articles and information not found on the main Dark Reading site. Just as a traditional newspaper offers in-depth sections or supplements on sports, entertainment, or politics, the Dark Reading Tech Centers provide an additional range of news and information for readers who have an interest in specific aspects of IT security.

While Dark Reading is always covering the latest attacks and vulnerabilities found by security researchers, we have not previously had a space dedicated to the internal process of collecting data about new threats and analyzing it to help set priorities within the security department. With the introduction of the Threat Intelligence Tech Center, we will have the space and resources to offer more advice and recommendations on how to correlate threat information and use those conclusions to create an action plan for your organization. The goal of the Risk Intelligence Tech Center is to provide deeper analysis on this data collecting and analysis process, providing a level of technical depth that we have not provided before.

With this charter in mind, you can expect the Threat Intelligence Tech Center to take a slightly different perspective than the rest of the Dark Reading site -- it will offer specific recommendations on how to do threat analysis, as well as feedback on the potential impact of new threats.

The goal of the Threat Intelligence Tech Center is to help you evaluate the latest sophisticated threats and zero-day vulnerabilities, helping you to gauge the seriousness of the threat to your organization and how to prioritize your responses. In some cases, we'll offer "how to" articles that look at best practices and tools. In other cases, we'll analyze the threats themselves and provide insight on how they might impact enterprises such as yours.

Of course, the creation of the Threat Intelligence Tech Center doesn't mean that our coverage of breaking news of emerging threats on the main Dark Reading site will decrease. You'll continue to see news and analysis of new exploits on our home page, and feedback on next-generation threats will remain a key topic of discussion for our bloggers and our reporting staff. But when you click on those stories or blogs, you'll be brought here, to the Tech Center, so that you can see the full range and depth of analysis that we offer on the topic, and gain additional context to support what you're reading.

We think the Threat Intelligence Tech Center will help you understand the security challenges that your organization may face, and make good decisions about the tools and practices that might work best. But in the end, this is your site. Please let us know what you think of the Tech Center, our coverage of new threats, and what you'd like to see us cover in more depth. We can't guarantee we'll answer every query with a story or in-depth report, but we'll do our best to meet your needs for additional information and analysis.

If it has to do with the process of collecting and analyzing data about new threats, you'll find it here. And if you don't, let us know -- our goal is to be the most comprehensive source of security vulnerability and threat news and information on the Web.

Tim Wilson is Editor of Dark Reading Tim Wilson is Editor in Chief and co-founder of Dark Reading.com, UBM Tech's online community for information security professionals. He is responsible for managing the site, assigning and editing content, and writing breaking news stories. Wilson has been recognized as one ... View Full Bio

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