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A Quarter Of Parents Fear Their Children Have Been Exposed To Cyberthreats In Past Year

One in five parents fail to monitor their child's online activity, according to Kaspersky Lab

ABINGDON, England, February 11, 2014 /PRNewswire/ --

More than a quarter (27%) of parents believe their children have been exposed to online risks, such as accessing inappropriate content or cyber bullying in the past 12 months, according to a Kaspersky Lab study[1]. Despite this, research to mark Safer Internet Day taking place on 11th February, has found that one in five parents (22%) takes no action to govern their children's online activity - whether on the home computer or mobile devices.

"Regardless of how their children are accessing the internet, parents must remain vigilant, supervise their internet use and consider parental control technologies. However, as a parent myself, I find these statistics particularly worrying when you consider the increasing number of children using connected smartphones today. After all, when children use mobile devices to access the web, they are using the same internet, with the same risks - yet parents are often not as aware of the dangers," says David Emm, senior security researcher at Kaspersky Lab.

The study also found that 18% of parents had lost money or data from their personal device as a result of their child's unmonitored access. With smartphone apps often being blamed in the press for children inadvertently spending hundreds of pounds, effective controls and open channels of communication around smartphone use is imperative.

David Emm continues: "There is a common misconception that smartphones and tablets don't need the same level of protection as a PC, but with such a high percentage of parents not having a clear view of their children's online activity, this way of thinking needs to change. The internet is an incredible resource, both for social use and in an educational capacity. But in the same way as we would teach our children to cross the road safely, we must teach them to be aware of, and respect, the dangers of the internet. Just because a threat is out of sight, it doesn't mean we shouldn't keep it front of mind."

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1. Kaspersky Consumer Security Risks Survey, B2B International and Kaspersky Lab

David Emm offers the following tips to stay safe online:

1) Both Android smartphones and iPhones come with in-built parental controls

- when purchasing a smartphone, ask the sales assistants to demonstrate these

features. They have policies in place and a responsibility to make parents aware of

these. By creating a demand, it is more likely they will let other parents know.

2) Apply settings that prevent in-app purchases to save hefty bills should

children stumble across a game with expensive add-ons.

3) Install security software - these providers will offer apps to filter out

inappropriate content, for example, adult images and senders of nuisance SMS messages.

4) Encourage children to talk about their online experience and in particular,

anything that makes them feel uncomfortable or threatened. Open a channel of

communication so they feel they can discuss all areas of their online life without

fear of judgement or reprimand.

5) Protecting children from cyber bullies is especially challenging with

smartphones as they can be targeted in so many ways, especially out of view of their

parents. Deal with cyber bullying as you would in real life by encouraging children to

be open and talk to a trusted adult if they experience any threatening or

inappropriate messages. Numbers and contacts on apps can both be blocked if they are

making children uncomfortable.

6) Use the internet for good - there are sites that can advise both parents and

children on how to manage online threats. Take a look at

http://www.thinkuknow.co.uk.

In response to these online threats that children are increasingly facing, Kaspersky Lab now offers a multi-device version of Kaspersky Internet Security.

The security software provides real-time protection for multiple Windows PCs, Macs and Android smartphones and tablets, all with a single licence allowing families to be protected on every device in their home and keep their children safe online. For more information on products and advice from Kaspersky Lab, visit http://www.kaspersky.co.uk.

About Kaspersky Lab

Kaspersky Lab is the world's largest privately held vendor of endpoint protection solutions. The company is ranked among the world's top four vendors of security solutions for endpoint users*. Throughout its more than 15-year history Kaspersky Lab has remained an innovator in IT security and provides effective digital security solutions for large enterprises, SMBs and consumers.

Kaspersky Lab, with its holding company registered in the United Kingdom, currently operates in almost 200 countries and territories across the globe, providing protection for over 300 million users worldwide. Learn more at http://www.kaspersky.co.uk.

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