Risk
8/17/2009
11:23 AM
Keith Ferrell
Keith Ferrell
Commentary
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Twitterbot Tweets Malware Orders

The discovery of a Twitter profile being used to tweet botnet updates and link is one more indication (not that we needed one) that cybercriminals are using the same tools that we are.

The discovery of a Twitter profile being used to tweet botnet updates and link is one more indication (not that we needed one) that cybercriminals are using the same tools that we are.The news that a Twitterer was actually a malware maker using tweets to send instructions to a botnet shows just how effective social networks can be for spreading malicious material.

In this case, according to the researcher who found the Twitter botnet commands, the botnet itself is an information stealer, most likely aimed at Brazilian banking and financial data.

The point, though, is the ease with which the social network was co-opted as a botnet command and communications network. Again, no big surprise -- the same ease of use and function that attract businesses to Twitter and other social networks as marketing and communications tools make it an effective malware and communications tool.

It's a case of hiding in plain sight and wreaking havoc while hidden there -- although Twitter has restricted the account in question. I find this particularly interesting in light of new figures suggesting that most tweets are meaningless. If Twitterers are already getting a high percentage of blabber that's easy to overlook, it becomes all that much easier to stream crimeware instructions in the current.

Like the crooks' use of url-shorteners we talked about here a few weeks ago, the use of Twitter to control and coordinate a botnet should be a signal to you and any of your employees who tweet to keep your guards up, and raise them a bit higher.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Flash Poll
Current Issue
Cartoon
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2014-2363
Published: 2014-07-26
Morpho Itemiser 3 8.17 has hardcoded administrative credentials, which makes it easier for remote attackers to obtain access via a login request.

CVE-2014-3071
Published: 2014-07-26
Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in the Data Quality Console in IBM InfoSphere Information Server 11.3 allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via a crafted URL for adding a project connection.

CVE-2014-3301
Published: 2014-07-26
The ProfileAction controller in Cisco WebEx Meetings Server (CWMS) 1.5(.1.131) and earlier allows remote attackers to obtain sensitive information by reading stack traces in returned messages, aka Bug ID CSCuj81700.

CVE-2014-3305
Published: 2014-07-26
Cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerability in the web framework in Cisco WebEx Meetings Server 1.5(.1.131) and earlier allows remote attackers to hijack the authentication of unspecified victims via unknown vectors, aka Bug ID CSCuj81735.

CVE-2014-3324
Published: 2014-07-26
Multiple cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerabilities in the login page in the administrative web interface in Cisco TelePresence Server Software 4.0(2.8) allow remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via a crafted parameter, aka Bug ID CSCup90060.

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Sara Peters hosts a conversation on Botnets and those who fight them.