Risk
4/14/2011
09:54 PM
50%
50%

TriGeo Customer Boosts Security With Appliance

Midmarket financial institution LegacyTexas Bank automates processes and reduces labor hours by deploying an SIEM appliance.

For many financial institutions, keeping up with federal regulations is getting harder and harder to do, and keeping tabs on network security risks and breaches has become more critical than ever.

For LegacyTexas Bank, a midmarket financial institution based in Plano, Texas, it was time to stop poring over event logs and start automating some of the process. That's why the bank decided to implement a security appliance from TriGeo Network Security, a vendor that provides Security Information and Event Management (SIEM).

According to LegacyTexas, the bank's significant growth over the past several years was another key factor in ratcheting up and automating its security efforts. LegacyTexas had seven branches and about $800 million in assets just six years ago; today it has 19 locations and $1.5 billion in assets.

"On top of that, our IT department supports more than just the bank," said Jon Drake, CIO of LegacyTexas, in an interview. "We have mortgage, title, insurance, and wealth advisory groups well. We decided to be proactive about security instead of reactive, so we can prevent problems from ever happening in the first place."

Drake said he knew right away that TriGeo's offering was the right one for LegacyTexas because it went beyond collecting logs and reporting results. With TriGeo's SIEM appliance, specific actions can be taken based on log results. For example, if two password entry attempts are made in a very short span of time--say, a second or two--the TriGeo appliance interprets this to mean that password cracking technology is being used (as no human could enter two passwords that quickly). The system disables the MAC address of the network where the password entry attempt is being made.

Another thing LegacyTexas likes about the TriGeo offering is that it puts all logs in the same format. "Every device creates a different log with a different format and a different look and feel," Drake said. "This solution accumulates them all and standardizes them in the same presentation, so we can parse the log data much more easily."

"LegacyTexas Bank is a great example of a company that understands the value of SIEM and the network visibility it provides companies beyond traditional log management," said Michelle Dickman, president and CEO of TriGeo. "The technology and support we provide [the LegacyTexas team] has helped the bank stay ahead of potential breaches, meet FFIEC and FDIC requirements, and gain an upper hand in audits."

In the "old days," before implementing the TriGeo appliance, the bank had two staffers report to work at 7 a.m. to go through the logs manually and seek out anomalies, Drake said. "Those [employees] spent an hour each, five days a week, going over the logs, and they probably hit only 1% of the records. Plus they were looking just at logs that appeared abnormal, so a lot of [suspect activity] was being missed." Today, the TriGeo appliance inspects all the logs and reports anything that's amiss. The result? Fewer (wo)man-hours wasted and much tighter network security.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
Five Things Every Business Executive Should Know About Cybersecurity
Don't get lost in security's technical minutiae - a clearer picture of what's at stake can help align business imperatives with technology execution.
Flash Poll
Dark Reading Strategic Security Report: The Impact of Enterprise Data Breaches
Dark Reading Strategic Security Report: The Impact of Enterprise Data Breaches
Social engineering, ransomware, and other sophisticated exploits are leading to new IT security compromises every day. Dark Reading's 2016 Strategic Security Survey polled 300 IT and security professionals to get information on breach incidents, the fallout they caused, and how recent events are shaping preparations for inevitable attacks in the coming year. Download this report to get a look at data from the survey and to find out what a breach might mean for your organization.
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2013-7445
Published: 2015-10-15
The Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) subsystem in the Linux kernel through 4.x mishandles requests for Graphics Execution Manager (GEM) objects, which allows context-dependent attackers to cause a denial of service (memory consumption) via an application that processes graphics data, as demonstrated b...

CVE-2015-4948
Published: 2015-10-15
netstat in IBM AIX 5.3, 6.1, and 7.1 and VIOS 2.2.x, when a fibre channel adapter is used, allows local users to gain privileges via unspecified vectors.

CVE-2015-5660
Published: 2015-10-15
Cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerability in eXtplorer before 2.1.8 allows remote attackers to hijack the authentication of arbitrary users for requests that execute PHP code.

CVE-2015-6003
Published: 2015-10-15
Directory traversal vulnerability in QNAP QTS before 4.1.4 build 0910 and 4.2.x before 4.2.0 RC2 build 0910, when AFP is enabled, allows remote attackers to read or write to arbitrary files by leveraging access to an OS X (1) user or (2) guest account.

CVE-2015-6333
Published: 2015-10-15
Cisco Application Policy Infrastructure Controller (APIC) 1.1j allows local users to gain privileges via vectors involving addition of an SSH key, aka Bug ID CSCuw46076.

Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Security researchers are finding that there's a growing market for the vulnerabilities they discover and persistent conundrum as to the right way to disclose them. Dark Reading editors will speak to experts -- Veracode CTO and co-founder Chris Wysopal and HackerOne co-founder and CTO Alex Rice -- about bug bounties and the expanding market for zero-day security vulnerabilities.