Risk
1/31/2008
07:09 PM
George V. Hulme
George V. Hulme
Commentary
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Toward Buffer Overflow Extinction

The first time a buffer overflow was used as part of an attack on information systems, at least the best I can find, was the infamous 1988 Morris worm. While the Morris worm propagated across Unix, buffer overflows have been the bane of Windows security for years. Microsoft is furthering its efforts to push this problem into the history books.

The first time a buffer overflow was used as part of an attack on information systems, at least the best I can find, was the infamous 1988 Morris worm. While the Morris worm propagated across Unix, buffer overflows have been the bane of Windows security for years. Microsoft is furthering its efforts to push this problem into the history books.Unless you're a programmer, you may never have heard of buffer overflows. But you've probably heard of Code Red, SQL Slammer, MS Blaster, as well as other attacks that buffer overflows made possible. Essentially, buffer overflows are programming errors. They result in the incorrect handling of temporary memory storage areas. And this can result in software crashing, just acting weird, and even be used to inject malicious software onto systems. That's where the worms and software exploits come in, and why it's so important this all-too-common programming mistake goes away.

To that end, Microsoft (as well as CPU manufacturers) started devising ways to make sure unwanted code isn't executed in the default heap or memory stack. It's called Data Execution Prevention (DEP), or No eXecute (NX). The first time this appeared in a Microsoft operating system was with Windows XP SP2. It's part of Vista, as well as Windows Server 2008 and Windows XP SP3.

Today, in his blog, one of Microsoft's security experts, Michael Howard, announced new application programming interfaces (APIs) that make it easier for Windows developers to add DEP protection in their application.

For those interested in how to implement the new APIs, Howard goes into some detail here.

For those of us who aren't so technically inclined, this is another step in the right direction, should developers employ the tools, toward improved software quality.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Flash Poll
Current Issue
Cartoon
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2013-6117
Published: 2014-07-11
Dahua DVR 2.608.0000.0 and 2.608.GV00.0 allows remote attackers to bypass authentication and obtain sensitive information including user credentials, change user passwords, clear log files, and perform other actions via a request to TCP port 37777.

CVE-2014-0174
Published: 2014-07-11
Cumin (aka MRG Management Console), as used in Red Hat Enterprise MRG 2.5, does not include the HTTPOnly flag in a Set-Cookie header for the session cookie, which makes it easier for remote attackers to obtain potentially sensitive information via script access to this cookie.

CVE-2014-3485
Published: 2014-07-11
The REST API in the ovirt-engine in oVirt, as used in Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (rhevm) 3.4, allows remote authenticated users to read arbitrary files and have other unspecified impact via unknown vectors, related to an XML External Entity (XXE) issue.

CVE-2014-3499
Published: 2014-07-11
Docker 1.0.0 uses world-readable and world-writable permissions on the management socket, which allows local users to gain privileges via unspecified vectors.

CVE-2014-3503
Published: 2014-07-11
Apache Syncope 1.1.x before 1.1.8 uses weak random values to generate passwords, which makes it easier for remote attackers to guess the password via a brute force attack.

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Marilyn Cohodas and her guests look at the evolving nature of the relationship between CIO and CSO.