Risk
2/11/2011
10:39 AM
George V. Hulme
George V. Hulme
Commentary
50%
50%

Think That iPhone Isn't A Corporate Security Risk?

If so, you had better think again. Researchers have shown how the passwords on the iPhone can be revealed in less than six minutes.

If so, you had better think again. Researchers have shown how the passwords on the iPhone can be revealed in less than six minutes.Security managers and CIOs alike have enough to worry about when it comes to securing mobile devices. They certainly didn't need to learn that many of the passwords stored on an iPhone can be had in about half the time it takes to hard boil an egg.

But that's exactly what researchers in Germany just disclosed, and it's raising eyebrows. The cracking technique requires attackers have physical access to the device. Considering how many mobile devices are lost every year, that's not much consolation in this case.

These researchers conducted their attack against an iPhone 4 (not jailbroken) equipped with the most recent firmware. iPads are susceptible, too. Researchers said. The passwords recovered are those used for wifi networks, some applications (depending on how they were programmed) as well as the password credentials to e-mail and VPNs.

Here's a video demonstration:

The tools and techniques needed to conduct the necessary jailbreak and file access are widely available. What this team did was figure out how to extract the actual passwords.

The researchers' full paper, Lost iPhone? Lost Passwords! Practical Consideration of iOS Device Encryption Security is available here in .pdf format.

For my security and technology observations throughout the day, find me on Twitter.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2015-4231
Published: 2015-07-03
The Python interpreter in Cisco NX-OS 6.2(8a) on Nexus 7000 devices allows local users to bypass intended access restrictions and delete an arbitrary VDC's files by leveraging administrative privileges in one VDC, aka Bug ID CSCur08416.

CVE-2015-4232
Published: 2015-07-03
Cisco NX-OS 6.2(10) on Nexus and MDS 9000 devices allows local users to execute arbitrary OS commands by entering crafted tar parameters in the CLI, aka Bug ID CSCus44856.

CVE-2015-4234
Published: 2015-07-03
Cisco NX-OS 6.0(2) and 6.2(2) on Nexus devices has an improper OS configuration, which allows local users to obtain root access via unspecified input to the Python interpreter, aka Bug IDs CSCun02887, CSCur00115, and CSCur00127.

CVE-2015-4237
Published: 2015-07-03
The CLI parser in Cisco NX-OS 4.1(2)E1(1), 6.2(11b), 6.2(12), 7.2(0)ZZ(99.1), 7.2(0)ZZ(99.3), and 9.1(1)SV1(3.1.8) on Nexus devices allows local users to execute arbitrary OS commands via crafted characters in a filename, aka Bug IDs CSCuv08491, CSCuv08443, CSCuv08480, CSCuv08448, CSCuu99291, CSCuv0...

CVE-2015-4239
Published: 2015-07-03
Cisco Adaptive Security Appliance (ASA) Software 9.3(2.243) and 100.13(0.21) allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (device reload) by sending crafted OSPFv2 packets on the local network, aka Bug ID CSCus84220.

Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Marc Spitler, co-author of the Verizon DBIR will share some of the lesser-known but most intriguing tidbits from the massive report