Risk
12/14/2007
09:34 AM
Keith Ferrell
Keith Ferrell
Commentary
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Survey: 40 Percent Of You Still Think Your Networks Are Insecure (And You're Probably Right)

And most of the rest of you continue to leave endpoints unguarded, according to a new survey of small and midsize businesses.

And most of the rest of you continue to leave endpoints unguarded, according to a new survey of small and midsize businesses.The survey from networking software developer GFI polled 455 IT execs from small and midsize businesses.

Among the most notable -- though least surprising -- findings was that while 42 percent of the respondents worried that their networks remained vulnerable, well over 90 percent had anti-virus software and firewalls deployed. 80 percent are using spam filters, though less than 20 percent had endpoint security solutions in-place.

That last is in line with the even small number -- 7 percent -- of you who are concerned about insider threats, and the threats posed by portable storage devices.

Which leads to the conclusion that the 42 percent insecurity finding -- as GFI points out -- may have less to do with the actual security of the networks than the growing perception that no amount of protection can actually deliver unbreachable security.

True enough -- as true in the digital age as it's been in every other age: there is no real security this side of the grave, the old saying goes.

But it's also true enough that deploying some aspects of a broad and robust multi-faceted security strategy while leaving others essentially ignored is a formula for problems, possibly, um, grave ones.

No wonder more than half of the respondents wanted more employee education on security issues, and a quarter wished their management better understood the nature of the security challenge. Presumably a better educated management would be more willing to spend the money needed to address all of danger-points, not just the most obvious ones.

Take a look at the entire survey here.

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