Risk
12/14/2007
09:34 AM
Keith Ferrell
Keith Ferrell
Commentary
50%
50%

Survey: 40 Percent Of You Still Think Your Networks Are Insecure (And You're Probably Right)

And most of the rest of you continue to leave endpoints unguarded, according to a new survey of small and midsize businesses.

And most of the rest of you continue to leave endpoints unguarded, according to a new survey of small and midsize businesses.The survey from networking software developer GFI polled 455 IT execs from small and midsize businesses.

Among the most notable -- though least surprising -- findings was that while 42 percent of the respondents worried that their networks remained vulnerable, well over 90 percent had anti-virus software and firewalls deployed. 80 percent are using spam filters, though less than 20 percent had endpoint security solutions in-place.

That last is in line with the even small number -- 7 percent -- of you who are concerned about insider threats, and the threats posed by portable storage devices.

Which leads to the conclusion that the 42 percent insecurity finding -- as GFI points out -- may have less to do with the actual security of the networks than the growing perception that no amount of protection can actually deliver unbreachable security.

True enough -- as true in the digital age as it's been in every other age: there is no real security this side of the grave, the old saying goes.

But it's also true enough that deploying some aspects of a broad and robust multi-faceted security strategy while leaving others essentially ignored is a formula for problems, possibly, um, grave ones.

No wonder more than half of the respondents wanted more employee education on security issues, and a quarter wished their management better understood the nature of the security challenge. Presumably a better educated management would be more willing to spend the money needed to address all of danger-points, not just the most obvious ones.

Take a look at the entire survey here.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2013-7441
Published: 2015-05-29
The modern style negotiation in Network Block Device (nbd-server) 2.9.22 through 3.3 allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (root process termination) by (1) closing the connection during negotiation or (2) specifying a name for a non-existent export.

CVE-2014-9727
Published: 2015-05-29
AVM Fritz!Box allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary commands via shell metacharacters in the var:lang parameter to cgi-bin/webcm.

CVE-2015-0200
Published: 2015-05-29
IBM WebSphere Commerce 6.x through 6.0.0.11 and 7.x before 7.0.0.8 IF2 allows local users to obtain sensitive database information via unspecified vectors.

CVE-2015-0751
Published: 2015-05-29
Cisco IP Phone 7861, when firmware from Cisco Unified Communications Manager 10.3(1) is used, allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service via crafted packets, aka Bug ID CSCus81800.

CVE-2015-0752
Published: 2015-05-29
Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in Cisco TelePresence Video Communication Server (VCS) X8.5.1 allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via a crafted URL, aka Bug ID CSCut27635.

Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
After a serious cybersecurity incident, everyone will be looking to you for answers -- but you’ll never have complete information and you’ll never have enough time. So in those heated moments, when a business is on the brink of collapse, how will you and the rest of the board room executives respond?