Risk
2/2/2008
09:07 PM
George V. Hulme
George V. Hulme
Commentary
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Super Bowl. Robo Security.

While the Department of Homeland Security says there are no specific terror threats regarding Super Bowl XLII, security is being taken seriously at the game, where the New England Patriots will face off against the New York Giants.

While the Department of Homeland Security says there are no specific terror threats regarding Super Bowl XLII, security is being taken seriously at the game, where the New England Patriots will face off against the New York Giants.The game has been designated a level one security event by the Department of Homeland Security. That authorizes the use of federal agencies, including the Department of Defense, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the Secret Service to help local and state law enforcement keep the event safe.

There's also a no fly zone, a secure perimeter, and spectators should expect to be vetted before getting through. And there's a list of prohibited items ranging from beach balls to weapons. Fans also can expect scads of security cameras and aircraft flying above surveying the area, while trained dogs will be on the lookout for explosives.

But if you're not going to the game, and you happen to notice a strange metallic object roaming around the stadium or parking lot while you're watching from home, don't worry, it's just probably an HD-1.

According to Northrop Grumman, the company will be providing support for robots produced by its subsidiary, Remotec. "We're here to support the event and hopefully go unnoticed by fans. Our job isn't to be a disruption but to keep danger at a distance," Mack Barber, president of Remotec, an operating unit of Northrop Grumman's Mission Systems sector, said in a release.

Northrop Grumman manufactures a variety of hazardous duty robots, all dubbed with sci-fi sounding names: The HD-1, F6A, Mark V-A1, Mini-Andros II, and the Wolverine. They're designed to deal with an array of nasty materials and explosives.

They'll be roaming a two-square mile zone around the stadium.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Flash Poll
Current Issue
Cartoon
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2013-6335
Published: 2014-08-26
The Backup-Archive client in IBM Tivoli Storage Manager (TSM) for Space Management 5.x and 6.x before 6.2.5.3, 6.3.x before 6.3.2, 6.4.x before 6.4.2, and 7.1.x before 7.1.0.3 on Linux and AIX, and 5.x and 6.x before 6.1.5.6 on Solaris and HP-UX, does not preserve file permissions across backup and ...

CVE-2014-0480
Published: 2014-08-26
The core.urlresolvers.reverse function in Django before 1.4.14, 1.5.x before 1.5.9, 1.6.x before 1.6.6, and 1.7 before release candidate 3 does not properly validate URLs, which allows remote attackers to conduct phishing attacks via a // (slash slash) in a URL, which triggers a scheme-relative URL ...

CVE-2014-0481
Published: 2014-08-26
The default configuration for the file upload handling system in Django before 1.4.14, 1.5.x before 1.5.9, 1.6.x before 1.6.6, and 1.7 before release candidate 3 uses a sequential file name generation process when a file with a conflicting name is uploaded, which allows remote attackers to cause a d...

CVE-2014-0482
Published: 2014-08-26
The contrib.auth.middleware.RemoteUserMiddleware middleware in Django before 1.4.14, 1.5.x before 1.5.9, 1.6.x before 1.6.6, and 1.7 before release candidate 3, when using the contrib.auth.backends.RemoteUserBackend backend, allows remote authenticated users to hijack web sessions via vectors relate...

CVE-2014-0483
Published: 2014-08-26
The administrative interface (contrib.admin) in Django before 1.4.14, 1.5.x before 1.5.9, 1.6.x before 1.6.6, and 1.7 before release candidate 3 does not check if a field represents a relationship between models, which allows remote authenticated users to obtain sensitive information via a to_field ...

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
This episode of Dark Reading Radio looks at infosec security from the big enterprise POV with interviews featuring Ron Plesco, Cyber Investigations, Intelligence & Analytics at KPMG; and Chris Inglis & Chris Bell of Securonix.