Risk
2/2/2008
09:07 PM
George V. Hulme
George V. Hulme
Commentary
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Super Bowl. Robo Security.

While the Department of Homeland Security says there are no specific terror threats regarding Super Bowl XLII, security is being taken seriously at the game, where the New England Patriots will face off against the New York Giants.

While the Department of Homeland Security says there are no specific terror threats regarding Super Bowl XLII, security is being taken seriously at the game, where the New England Patriots will face off against the New York Giants.The game has been designated a level one security event by the Department of Homeland Security. That authorizes the use of federal agencies, including the Department of Defense, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the Secret Service to help local and state law enforcement keep the event safe.

There's also a no fly zone, a secure perimeter, and spectators should expect to be vetted before getting through. And there's a list of prohibited items ranging from beach balls to weapons. Fans also can expect scads of security cameras and aircraft flying above surveying the area, while trained dogs will be on the lookout for explosives.

But if you're not going to the game, and you happen to notice a strange metallic object roaming around the stadium or parking lot while you're watching from home, don't worry, it's just probably an HD-1.

According to Northrop Grumman, the company will be providing support for robots produced by its subsidiary, Remotec. "We're here to support the event and hopefully go unnoticed by fans. Our job isn't to be a disruption but to keep danger at a distance," Mack Barber, president of Remotec, an operating unit of Northrop Grumman's Mission Systems sector, said in a release.

Northrop Grumman manufactures a variety of hazardous duty robots, all dubbed with sci-fi sounding names: The HD-1, F6A, Mark V-A1, Mini-Andros II, and the Wolverine. They're designed to deal with an array of nasty materials and explosives.

They'll be roaming a two-square mile zone around the stadium.

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