Risk
4/30/2009
03:18 PM
Keith Ferrell
Keith Ferrell
Commentary
50%
50%

Spam Close To 2 Year High: 85% Of Mail Now Spam

Nobody really expected spam levels to stay low after the McColo takedown last year and, as a new MessageLabs report shows, they haven't. In fact, spam levels are as high as they've been in 19 months, crossing the 85% level for the first time since September '87.

Nobody really expected spam levels to stay low after the McColo takedown last year and, as a new MessageLabs report shows, they haven't. In fact, spam levels are as high as they've been in 19 months, crossing the 85% level for the first time since September '87.Last year's McColo domain takedown cut spam rates by half -- but the lower rate didn't last half long enough, as a new report from MessageLabs shows.

Spam is up, but so is the effectiveness of spam filters and, one hopes, increased public awareness of what sorts of mail to avoid.

Like unsolicited mail with apparently legit links: Image spam is back with a vengeance, according to MessageLabs' April 2009 Intelligence Report, with the spammers now hosting their images on apparently trustworthy site, rather than including them in spam e-mail itself.

That's one of the latest tricks being employed by spammers to get around filterware and other defensive tools.

There's plenty to defend against: Spam levels jumped 10% in April, accounting for 85% of global e-mail traffic, and hitting its highest level since early autumn, 2007.

Some countries have it worse than others: England's spam rate was 94% (a 25% increase) earning it the designation of the world' most spammed country.

Levels like that make this a good time remind your staff to steer clear of unsolicited e-mail, e-mail with links, any e-mail that isn't related to your business.

This is particularly important as the economy continues to suffer. Spammers are using economic scarelines, come-ons, and attention grabbers in hopes of getting their hooks into nervous consumers.

You and your employees and co-workers, after all, already have enough to worry about without falling for a too-good-to-be-anything-but-spam scam.

Read the whole MessageLabs Intelligence Report here.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Dark Reading Tech Digest, Dec. 19, 2014
Software-defined networking can be a net plus for security. The key: Work with the network team to implement gradually, test as you go, and take the opportunity to overhaul your security strategy.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2013-4440
Published: 2014-12-19
Password Generator (aka Pwgen) before 2.07 generates weak non-tty passwords, which makes it easier for context-dependent attackers to guess the password via a brute-force attack.

CVE-2013-4442
Published: 2014-12-19
Password Generator (aka Pwgen) before 2.07 uses weak pseudo generated numbers when /dev/urandom is unavailable, which makes it easier for context-dependent attackers to guess the numbers.

CVE-2013-7401
Published: 2014-12-19
The parse_request function in request.c in c-icap 0.2.x allows remote attackers to cause a denial of service (crash) via a URI without a " " or "?" character in an ICAP request, as demonstrated by use of the OPTIONS method.

CVE-2014-2026
Published: 2014-12-19
Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in the search functionality in United Planet Intrexx Professional before 5.2 Online Update 0905 and 6.x before 6.0 Online Update 10 allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via the request parameter.

CVE-2014-2716
Published: 2014-12-19
Ekahau B4 staff badge tag 5.7 with firmware 1.4.52, Real-Time Location System (RTLS) Controller 6.0.5-FINAL, and Activator 3 reuses the RC4 cipher stream, which makes it easier for remote attackers to obtain plaintext messages via an XOR operation on two ciphertexts.

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Join us Wednesday, Dec. 17 at 1 p.m. Eastern Time to hear what employers are really looking for in a chief information security officer -- it may not be what you think.