01:46 PM
Connect Directly

Sony PlayStation Site Hacked With 'Scareware'

The site runs a script that pretends to do an online security scan of your computer and presents a bogus warning message that your PC is infected with malware, researchers said.

A new wave of SQL injection attacks is spreading across the Internet, and Sony USA's PlayStation Web site is among the victims.

"Visiting the affected PlayStation site runs a script that pretends to do an online security scan of your computer, and presents a bogus warning message that your PC is infected with a variety of different pieces of malware," the SophosLabs blog explains. "Users frightened by the scareware 'warnings' might rush to spend money on useless software."

SQL injection attacks involve passing malicious code to SQL databases as user input. An improperly configured or vulnerable SQL application can be made to execute that input. All that's needed is to add HTML into a Web page that calls a script on a malicious site.

Since January, SQL injection attacks have surged across the Web. Researchers at the SANS Internet Storm Center and elsewhere have said that the reason for this is the existence of an automated tool that searches for sites running vulnerable software and attacks them. Attackers can configure the tool to insert any code they want.

Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant, said that the code used in the Sony site attack is just a snippet of code that pulls in content from a malicious site. The malicious code currently just tries to scare visitors to Sony's PlayStation site with bogus malware warnings, but it could just as easily install a keylogging Trojan, he said.

Cluley said that the malware has been active for a day or two and that Sony has been alerted to its presence. "The last time we looked the problem was still present," he said.

This is not a problem exclusive to Sony, however. "We are seeing hundreds of legitimate Web sites affected by this every day," Cluley said. "If you're a business, you need to harden your Web site to stop this from happening again and again."

Cluley noted that users of Firefox 3 should be immune to this attack because it recognizes third-party sites hosting malicious code as part of its new anti-malware functionality. "The good news is that Firefox 3 does actually intercept the attempt to go to the malicious Web site," he said. He also said that a plug-in called NoScript can help keep Firefox 2 and 3 users safe.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
Five Emerging Security Threats - And What You Can Learn From Them
At Black Hat USA, researchers unveiled some nasty vulnerabilities. Is your organization ready?
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
Published: 2015-10-15
The Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) subsystem in the Linux kernel through 4.x mishandles requests for Graphics Execution Manager (GEM) objects, which allows context-dependent attackers to cause a denial of service (memory consumption) via an application that processes graphics data, as demonstrated b...

Published: 2015-10-15
netstat in IBM AIX 5.3, 6.1, and 7.1 and VIOS 2.2.x, when a fibre channel adapter is used, allows local users to gain privileges via unspecified vectors.

Published: 2015-10-15
Cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerability in eXtplorer before 2.1.8 allows remote attackers to hijack the authentication of arbitrary users for requests that execute PHP code.

Published: 2015-10-15
Directory traversal vulnerability in QNAP QTS before 4.1.4 build 0910 and 4.2.x before 4.2.0 RC2 build 0910, when AFP is enabled, allows remote attackers to read or write to arbitrary files by leveraging access to an OS X (1) user or (2) guest account.

Published: 2015-10-15
Cisco Application Policy Infrastructure Controller (APIC) 1.1j allows local users to gain privileges via vectors involving addition of an SSH key, aka Bug ID CSCuw46076.

Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
According to industry estimates, about a million new IT security jobs will be created in the next two years but there aren't enough skilled professionals to fill them. On top of that, there isn't necessarily a clear path to a career in security. Dark Reading Executive Editor Kelly Jackson Higgins hosts guests Carson Sweet, co-founder and CTO of CloudPassage, which published a shocking study of the security gap in top US undergrad computer science programs, and Rodney Petersen, head of NIST's new National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education.