Risk
3/12/2014
09:06 AM
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Snowden, Bitcoin, Data Breaches Foretell New Regulations

It's inevitable that more businesses will be penalized for breaking customer trust. Is your enterprise prepared for new security laws?

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pfretty
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pfretty,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/19/2014 | 1:13:03 PM
Culture
These ongoing events should be a wake-up call for organizations around the importance of a security first culture. Beyond simply integrating the best technologies fighting this fight means embracing an education-based strategy that improves awareness and ultimately helps bring costs back under control.  Some interesting stats that paint the full picture within the 2013 HP Ponemon Cost of Cyber Crime report available here: (http://www.hpenterprisesecurity.com/ponemon-study-2013).  

 

Peter Fretty (j.mp/pfrettyhp)
PeteJW
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PeteJW,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/13/2014 | 6:42:43 PM
Re: Variable-size teeth
Interesting - I quite like the idea of variable-sized teeth, though how easy it would be to administer and control I'm not so sure. IMO regulations have to be more prescriptive so that large organiztions can't manouvre their way around by achieving only the very basic levels of compliance -- tick-in-the-box approach.
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/12/2014 | 7:25:59 PM
Re: Variable-size teeth
@Lorna that makes sense. For some companies the fines are a relative drop in the bucket. 
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Ninja
3/12/2014 | 10:54:32 AM
Variable-size teeth
Here's what's smart: "fines of up to 5% of annual revenue are being proposed for noncompliance."

Part of the problem with HIPAA and some other regs is that for large institutions, it's less expensive to pay the fines than to do the work to comply. Yet if fines were high enough to really bite those orgs, they'd put small practices out of business. A sliding scale is needed.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/12/2014 | 9:30:54 AM
More regs?
Our own security expert Mathew Schwartz has argued more financial penalties are necessary in order to make some retailers bear down on security. Structuring those rules to ensure that both retailers and the major credit card companies make changes (changes that will require serious financial investment) will be no small feat. Do you agree readers?
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