Risk
8/29/2007
12:58 PM
Keith Ferrell
Keith Ferrell
Commentary
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Small Business Lessons From Big Monster's Big Security SNAFU

How you handle news of a security breach can be as important to your business as how you handle the breach itself. And how you handle perception of your handling ranks just as high.

How you handle news of a security breach can be as important to your business as how you handle the breach itself. And how you handle perception of your handling ranks just as high.Among the ongoing (and ongoing and ongoing) fallout from mega job-poster Monster.com's security lapse is the news that Monster took five days to inform its users of the breach.

Ooooops.

While there are plenty of people who will tell you that a five-day turn on a million-plus breach is pretty responsive, you won't find that attitude in the press, you won't find it among Monster's compromised users.

The lesson from this is that whatever the nature of a security breach, you must mount a zero-day response. That means now, immediately, pronto, post-haste.

If your company gets breached, take a (quick) deep breath, get your recovery teams to work and start getting to work on getting the word to affected customers, vendors, contacts.

The consequences won't necessarily be any easier to swallow, but you'll at least be swallowing them without the unwanted seasoning of charges of denial, or, worse, deception.

It's a lesson easier learned by small to midsized businesses because you don't have to deal with the levels of bureaucracy, bad advice, BS and butt-covering that gets bigbiz into bad PR straits.

In other words, when it comes to notification of security problems, don't do as they do -- and don't do as they (don't) say, either.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Dark Reading Must Reads - September 25, 2014
Dark Reading's new Must Reads is a compendium of our best recent coverage of identity and access management. Learn about access control in the age of HTML5, how to improve authentication, why Active Directory is dead, and more.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2012-5485
Published: 2014-09-30
registerConfiglet.py in Plone before 4.2.3 and 4.3 before beta 1 allows remote attackers to execute Python code via unspecified vectors, related to the admin interface.

CVE-2012-5486
Published: 2014-09-30
ZPublisher.HTTPRequest._scrubHeader in Zope 2 before 2.13.19, as used in Plone before 4.3 beta 1, allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary HTTP headers via a linefeed (LF) character.

CVE-2012-5487
Published: 2014-09-30
The sandbox whitelisting function (allowmodule.py) in Plone before 4.2.3 and 4.3 before beta 1 allows remote authenticated users with certain privileges to bypass the Python sandbox restriction and execute arbitrary Python code via vectors related to importing.

CVE-2012-5488
Published: 2014-09-30
python_scripts.py in Plone before 4.2.3 and 4.3 before beta 1 allows remote attackers to execute Python code via a crafted URL, related to createObject.

CVE-2012-5489
Published: 2014-09-30
The App.Undo.UndoSupport.get_request_var_or_attr function in Zope before 2.12.21 and 3.13.x before 2.13.11, as used in Plone before 4.2.3 and 4.3 before beta 1, allows remote authenticated users to gain access to restricted attributes via unspecified vectors.

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
In our next Dark Reading Radio broadcast, we’ll take a close look at some of the latest research and practices in application security.